Last modified on 5 February 2015, at 21:22

gout

See also: goût

EnglishEdit

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EtymologyEdit

Old French gote, gute, from Latin gutta (drop)

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

gout (plural gouts)

  1. (pathology, not countable) An extremely painful inflammation of joints, especially of the big toe, caused by a metabolic defect resulting in the accumulation of uric acid in the blood and the deposition of urates around the joints.
  2. (usually followed by of) A spurt or splotch.
    • c. 1607, William Shakespeare, Macbeth, act 2, scene 1:
      I see thee still,
      And on thy blade and dudgeon gouts of blood.
    • 1981, P. D. James, Children of Men, ch. 20, page 137:
      [S]mall chunks of rubble and gouts of soot had fallen from the chimney, and were ground into the rug under his unwary feet.
    • 2002, Mercedes Lackey, Eric Flint and Dave Freer, The Shadow of the Lion, (Google preview):
      Another blow sent gouts of blood flying, along with gobbets of flesh.
  3. (rare) A disease of wheat and cornstalks, caused by insect larvae.[1]

SynonymsEdit

Related termsEdit

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Oxford English Dictionary, second edition (1989)

FrenchEdit

NounEdit

gout m (plural gouts)

  1. Alternative spelling of goût

Usage notesEdit

This spelling was a product of the 1990 French spelling reforms.

External linksEdit


Middle DutchEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Dutch golt, from Proto-Germanic *gulþą.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

gout n (stem goud-)

  1. gold

DescendantsEdit