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EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɜː(r)t

Etymology 1Edit

From earlier spirt, sprit (to sprout), from Middle English sprutten, from Old English spryttan, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *(s)per- (to strew, sow, sprinkle).

VerbEdit

spurt (third-person singular simple present spurts, present participle spurting, simple past and past participle spurted)

  1. (transitive) To cause to gush out suddenly or violently in a stream or jet.
  2. (intransitive) To rush from a confined place in a small stream or jet.
    • Alexander Pope
      Thus the small jet, which hasty hands unlock, / Spurts in the gardener's eyes who turns the cock.
    • 1897, Bram Stoker, Dracula Chapter 21
      With that he pulled open his shirt, and with his long sharp nails opened a vein in his breast. When the blood began to spurt out, he took my hands in one of his, holding them tight, and with the other seized my neck and pressed my mouth to the wound, so that I must either suffocate or swallow some to the . . . Oh, my God! My God! What have I done?

SynonymsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

NounEdit

spurt (plural spurts)

  1. A brief gush, as of liquid spurting from an orifice or a cut/wound.
    a spurt of water; a spurt of blood
  2. (slang) Ejaculation of semen. (Can we add an example for this sense?)
  3. (obsolete) A shoot; a bud.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Holland to this entry?)

TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Origin uncertain. May be derived from Etymology 1.

NounEdit

spurt (plural spurts)

  1. A moment, a short period of time.
  2. A sudden brief burst of, or increase in, speed, effort, activity, emotion or development.
    The boss's visit prompted a brief spurt of activity.
    • T. Hughes
      The long, steady sweep of the so-called "paddle" tried him almost as much as the breathless strain of the spurt.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

spurt (third-person singular simple present spurts, present participle spurting, simple past and past participle spurted)

  1. (intransitive) To make a strong effort for a short period of time.
    The bullion market spurted on Thursday.
    The runners spurted to the last lap as if they had extracted new energy from the applauds of the audience.

TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


DanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From English spurt.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /spuːrt/, [sb̥uɐ̯ˀd̥]

NounEdit

spurt c (singular definite spurten, plural indefinite spurter)

  1. spurt (any sudden but not prolonged action)

InflectionEdit

Related termsEdit

VerbEdit

spurt

  1. imperative of spurte

DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowing from English spurt.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

spurt m (plural spurts, diminutive spurtje n)

  1. spurt (short sudden energetic effort), especially in running or cycling

Related termsEdit


FaroeseEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

spurt

  1. supine form of spyrja

NounEdit

spurt

  1. indefinite accusative singular of spurtur

Norwegian BokmålEdit

VerbEdit

spurt

  1. past participle of spørre

Norwegian NynorskEdit

VerbEdit

spurt

  1. neuter past participle of spørja and spørje

SwedishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From English spurt.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

spurt (c)

  1. spurt (any sudden but not prolonged action)

InflectionEdit

Declension of spurt 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative spurt spurten spurter spurterna
Genitive spurts spurtens spurters spurternas

Related termsEdit