EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Spanish gringo, from griego (Greek), used for anyone who spoke an unintelligible language. Doublet of Greek.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ɡɹɪŋɡəʊ/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɪŋɡəʊ

NounEdit

gringo (plural gringos or gringoes)

  1. (slang, often derogatory) A white person from an English-speaking country, particularly the United States.
    • 2017, B. M. Bower, The Gringos: The Tale of the California Gold Rush Days
      Truly it is as Don José tells me; these gringos have come but to make trouble where all was peace.

SynonymsEdit

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TranslationsEdit

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AnagramsEdit


PortugueseEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Spanish gringo.

NounEdit

gringo m (plural gringos, feminine gringa, feminine plural gringas)

  1. (Brazil, colloquial) a foreigner, especially one from a Northern country and especially one from the United States
    Synonym: estrangeiro

Usage notesEdit

Unlike English and Spanish gringo, this Portuguese term is not inherently offensive.

AdjectiveEdit

gringo (feminine gringa, masculine plural gringos, feminine plural gringas)

  1. (slang, Brazil) foreign (from another country, especially the United States or another developed one)
    Aquele cara ali é gringo.
    That dude over there is a foreigner.
    Comprei um telefone gringo.
    I bought a foreign-made telephone.

SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Possibly from griego (Greek), particularly from the phrase hablar en griego (to speak Greek), with a similar connotation to the English phrase it's all Greek to me. Possibly influenced by peregrino (pilgrim).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈɡɾinɡo/, [ˈɡɾĩŋ.ɡo]

NounEdit

gringo m (plural gringos, feminine gringa, feminine plural gringas)

  1. (sometimes derogatory, Latin America) a fair skinned foreigner whose native language is not Spanish
    • 1996, Félix Rodríguez González, quoting Esteban de Terroros y Pando, 1786, Spanish Loanwords in the English Language[1], →ISBN, page 143:
      ... gringos, llaman en Málaga a los extranjeros, que tienen cierta especie de acento, que los priva de una locución fácil, y natural Castellana; y en Madrid dan el mismo, y por la misma causa con particularidad a los irlandeses.
      gringos is what, in Malaga, they call foreigners who have a certain kind of accent that prevents them from speaking Castilian easily and naturally; and in Madrid they give the same name, in particular, to the Irish.
    Synonyms: (Spain, Mexico) gabacho, (Spain) guiri
  2. (sometimes derogatory, Latin America) an American (a person from the United States), particularly a white American
    • 2008 October 8, Antonio Caballero, “El negro gringo (o el gringo negro)”, in Semana[2], retrieved 2014-08-01:
      Pero la realidad es más terca que la corrección política, y el hecho real es que Barack Obama, próximo presidente de los Estados Unidos, es un gringo, y es un negro. O, si se prefiere así, es un negro, y es un gringo.
      But the reality is more stubborn than political correctness, and the fact is that Barack Obama, the next president of the United States, is a gringo, and is a black. Or, if you so prefer, is a black, and a gringo.

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • English: gringo
  • Portuguese: gringo

See alsoEdit

Further readingEdit