See also: italian

English edit

 
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Wiktionary
Italian edition of Wiktionary
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Etymology edit

From Middle English Italian, from Medieval Latin Italiānus, from Latin Italia (Italy).

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ɪˈtæljən/, enPR: ĭtălʹyən
  • (file)
  • (US, less common) IPA(key): /ˌaɪˈtæljən/

Adjective edit

Italian (comparative more Italian, superlative most Italian)

  1. Pertaining to Italy, its people or its language.
  2. (obsolete, not comparable) Using an italic style; italic.
    • 1868, Henry Noel Humphreys, A History of the Art of Printing, page 175:
      It has been shown that there was a great disposition on the part of some German printers, especially Albert Durer, to adopt the rounded Italian type; others preferring the crisp angularity of the Gothic black-letter, even for general purposes; while for books of devotion it appears to have been deemed the more orthodox; the Italian style of type being deemed an innovation.

Synonyms edit

Derived terms edit

Translations edit

Noun edit

Italian (countable and uncountable, plural Italians)

  1. (countable) An inhabitant of Italy, or a person of Italian descent.
    Synonyms: Eyetie, greaseball, goombah, guido, guinea, wop
    • 2012 May 5, Phil McNulty, “Chelsea 2-1 Liverpool”, in BBC Sport[1]:
      As Di Matteo celebrated and captain John Terry raised the trophy for the fourth time, the Italian increased his claims to become the permanent successor to Andre Villas-Boas by landing a trophy.
  2. (uncountable) The official language of Italy, also spoken in San Marino, the Vatican, and parts of Argentina, Slovenia and Switzerland.
  3. (uncountable, cooking) A style of cuisine or individual dishes of or associated with Italy or Italian people.
    • 1995, Betty Crocker's New Italian Cooking, page 5:
      Simple Cannoli, Lemon Ice, or a delicious Tira Mi Su. With so many wonderful recipes, you can eat Italian anytime.
  4. (uncountable, textiles) A type of linen or cotton cloth with satin finish used primarily for linings, Italian cloth.
  5. (uncountable) Italian vermouth, a dark-colored, sweet or mildly bitter vermouth.
    gin and Italian
    • 1971, John Doxat, The World of Drinks and Drinking, page 102:
      So the English women would have been interested in American drinks, and in came the gin-and-Italian, for example.
  6. (countable) An Italian sandwich.

Meronyms edit

(language):

Derived terms edit

Translations edit

See also edit

Further reading edit

Anagrams edit

Basque edit

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /italian/ [i.t̪a.li.ãn]
  • Rhymes: -ian
  • Hyphenation: I‧ta‧li‧an

Proper noun edit

Italian

  1. inessive indefinite of Italia

Finnish edit

Proper noun edit

Italian

  1. genitive singular of Italia

Anagrams edit