See also: Grog

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

An allusion to Admiral Edward Vernon (nicknamed “Old Grog” after the grogram coat he habitually wore), who in 1740 ordered his sailors' rum to be watered down.[1][2]

This etymology is incomplete. You can help Wiktionary by elaborating on the origins of this term.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

grog (countable and uncountable, plural grogs)

  1. (original meaning) An alcoholic beverage made with rum and water, especially that once issued to sailors of the Royal Navy.
  2. (by extension, Australia, New Zealand) Any alcoholic beverage.
    • 1897, Bram Stoker, Dracula, published 1993, page 142:
      I quite understood their drift, and after a stiff glass of grog, or rather more of the same, and with each a sovereign in hand, they made light of the attack, and swore they would encounter a worse madman any day for the pleasure of meeting so 'bloomin' good a bloke' as your correspondent.
  3. (countable, Australia, New Zealand) A glass or serving of an alcoholic beverage.
  4. An alcoholic beverage made with hot water or tea, sugar and rum, sometimes also with lemon or lime juice and spices, particularly cinnamon.
  5. (ceramics) A type of pre-fired clay that has been ground and screened to a specific particle size.
    Synonyms: chamotte, firesand

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

grog (third-person singular simple present grogs, present participle grogging, simple past and past participle grogged)

  1. (ceramics) To grind and screen (clay) to a specific particle size.

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ grog” in Dictionary.com Unabridged, Dictionary.com, LLC, 1995–present.
  2. ^ Douglas Harper (2001–2022), “grog”, in Online Etymology Dictionary.

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From English grog.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

grog m (plural grogs)

  1. grog (drink made from rum)

DescendantsEdit

Further readingEdit


RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French grog.

NounEdit

grog n (plural groguri)

  1. grog

DeclensionEdit


WelshEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

grog

  1. Soft mutation of crog.

MutationEdit

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
crog grog nghrog chrog
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.