Open main menu

FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle French haïr (to hate), from Old French hair (to hate) (compare Old French enhadir (to become filled with hate)), from Frankish *hatjan (to hate), from Proto-Germanic *hatjaną (to hunt, rush, attack), from Proto-Indo-European *ḱād- (strong emotion). Akin to Old High German hezzen (to hunt, pursue), Old English hettan (to pursue, persecute), Old English hete (hate, hatred). More at hate, heinous.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

haïr

  1. (transitive) to hate

Usage notesEdit

  • In Standard French, the h of haïr is said to be aspiré (aspirate) and therefore shows that elisions of vowels and liaisons are not possible, i.e. “I hate you (sg.)” is je te hais, not je t’hais.
  • In Canadian French, the past historic is used as the present tense for the first, second, and third person singular subject pronouns. Also, the "h" is not aspirated, therefore making elisions possible. For example: "I hate you" is "je t'haïs." Note that this usage is vernacular and not standard.
  • In Louisiana, the "h" retains its pronunciation as the consonant /h/.

ConjugationEdit

This verb is spelled as if conjugated like finir, but has a diaeresis throughout its conjugation (including where the circumflex would normally be used) except in the singular indicative present, whose forms are pronounced /ɛ/ in Standard French instead of /ai/, a pronunciation nonetheless often found in informal speech.

See alsoEdit

Further readingEdit


Middle FrenchEdit

VerbEdit

haïr

  1. (transitive) to hate

Old FrenchEdit

VerbEdit

haïr

  1. Alternative form of hair

Usage notesEdit