See also: hâte and hâté

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English haten, from Old English hatian (to hate, treat as an enemy), from Proto-Germanic *hatōną (to hate), from Proto-Germanic *hataz (hatred, hate), from Proto-Indo-European *ḱād- (strong emotion). Cognate with Dutch haten, German hassen, Swedish hata, French haïr (a Germanic borrowing).

VerbEdit

hate (third-person singular simple present hates, present participle hating, simple past and past participle hated)

  1. (transitive) To dislike intensely or greatly.
    I hate men who take advantage of women.
  2. (transitive, slang) To dislike intensely due to envy.
    Don't be hating my weave, girl, you're just jealous!
SynonymsEdit
AntonymsEdit
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Old English hete, from Proto-Germanic *hataz. Cognate with West Frisian haat, Dutch haat, German Hass, Swedish hat.

NounEdit

hate (countable and uncountable, plural hates)

  1. An object of hatred.
    One of my pet hates is traffic wardens.
  2. Hatred.
    He gave me a look filled with pure hate.
  3. (Internet, colloquial) Negative feedback, abusive behaviour.
    There was a lot of hate in the comments on my vlog about Justin Beiber from his fans.
TranslationsEdit
Related termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


Cia-CiaEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *qatay, from Proto-Austronesian *qaCay.

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

hate (Hangul spelling 하떼)

  1. (anatomy) liver (organ of the body)

ReferencesEdit

  • Van den Berg, Rene (1991). "Preliminary Notes on the Cia-Cia Language," in Excursies in Celebes, pp. 305-324.

DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

hate

  1. singular present subjunctive of haten

JapaneseEdit

RomanizationEdit

hate

  1. rōmaji reading of はて
Last modified on 11 April 2014, at 00:06