English

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Etymology

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hasty +‎ -ly

Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): /ˈheɪstɪli/
  • Audio (US):(file)
  • Hyphenation: hast‧i‧ly

Adverb

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hastily (comparative more hastily, superlative most hastily)

  1. In a hasty manner; quickly or hurriedly.
    • 1921, Ben Travers, chapter 5, in A Cuckoo in the Nest, Garden City, N.Y.: Doubleday, Page & Company, published 1925, →OCLC:
      The departure was not unduly prolonged. [] Within the door Mrs. Spoker hastily imparted to Mrs. Love a few final sentiments on the subject of Divine Intention in the disposition of buckets; farewells and last commiserations; a deep, guttural instigation to the horse; and the wheels of the waggonette crunched heavily away into obscurity.
    • 1945 September and October, C. Hamilton Ellis, “Royal Trains—V”, in Railway Magazine, page 251:
      The last occasion on which the Kaiser [Wilhelm II] used this train was for an inglorious journey into Holland towards the end of the 1914 war. He spent the night in it at Eysden [Eijsden], while the Queen of the Netherlands and a hastily summoned Cabinet debated what to do with him.
    • 1966, James Workman, The Mad Emperor, Melbourne, Sydney: Scripts, page 40:
      Eudemis moved hastily but as unobtrusively as he could through the gaping crowd[.]
  2. (obsolete) Soon, shortly.

Synonyms

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Translations

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