Chavacano

edit

Etymology

edit

From Spanish hueso, from Old Spanish huesso, from Latin ossum, popular variant of os.

Pronunciation

edit

Noun

edit

hueso

  1. (anatomy) bone

Spanish

edit
 
Spanish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia es

Etymology

edit

Inherited from Old Spanish huesso, from Latin ossum, popular variant of os, ossis, from Proto-Italic *ōs, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *h₃ésth₁ (bone), *h₂óst.

Compare Catalan os, French os, Interlingua osso, Italian osso, Portuguese osso, Romanian os, Sardinian ossu.

Political sense comes from comparing a dog looking for and defending a bone and a politician searching for a position.

Pronunciation

edit
  • IPA(key): /ˈw̝eso/ [ˈw̝e.so]
    • Audio:(file)
    • Syllabification: hue‧so
  • IPA(key): (dialectal) /ˈbweso/ [ˈbwe.so], /ˈɡweso/ [ˈɡwe.so]
  • Rhymes: -eso

Noun

edit

hueso m (plural huesos)

  1. (anatomy) bone
    El perro enterró un hueso.
    The dog buried a bone.
    Los adultos tienen 206 huesos.
    Adults have 206 bones.
  2. (botany) stone, pit (the central part of some fruits, consisting of the seed and a hard endocarp layer (like those of peach, olive, avocado or mango))
  3. (politics, Mexico, slang) political position (appointed or elected)
  4. (Spain, informal) strict person

Derived terms

edit
edit

Further reading

edit