impossible

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French impossible, from Latin impossibilis, from in- (not) + possibilis (possible), from possum (to be able) + suffix -ibilis (-able).

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ɪmˈpɒs.ɪ.bəl/, /ɪmˈpɒs.ə.bəl/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ɪmˈpɑ.sə.bl̩/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: im‧pos‧si‧ble

AdjectiveEdit

impossible (not generally comparable, comparative more impossible, superlative most impossible)

  1. Not possible; not able to be done or happen.
    It is difficult, if not impossible, to memorize 20,000 consecutive numbers.
    Sarah thinks that nothing is impossible because things can always somehow happen.
  2. (colloquial, of a person) Very difficult to deal with.
    You never listen to a word I say – you're impossible!
    2006, Amanda Palmer (lyrics and music), “Delilah”, in Yes, Virginia..., performed by The Dresden Dolls:
    I never met a more impossible girl.
  3. (mathematics, dated) imaginary
    impossible quantities, or imaginary numbers

SynonymsEdit

AntonymsEdit

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TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

impossible (plural impossibles)

  1. (obsolete) an impossibility

TranslationsEdit


CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin impossibilis, equivalent to in- +‎ possible.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

impossible (masculine and feminine plural impossibles)

  1. impossible
    Antonym: possible

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From im- +‎ possible.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

impossible (plural impossibles)

  1. impossible

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit


Middle FrenchEdit

AdjectiveEdit

impossible m or f (plural impossibles)

  1. impossible