See also: Done, doné, and doně

EnglishEdit

 
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Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English don, idon, ȝedon, gedon, from Old English dōn, ġedōn, from Proto-West Germanic *dān, from Proto-Germanic *dēnaz (past participle of *dōną (to do)). Equivalent to do +‎ -en. Cognate with Scots dune, deen, dene, dane (done), Saterland Frisian däin (done), West Frisian dien (done), Dutch gedaan (done), German Low German daan (done), German getan (done). More at do.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

done (comparative more done, superlative most done)

  1. (of food) Ready, fully cooked.
    As soon as the potatoes are done we can sit down and eat.
  2. Having completed or finished an activity.
    He pushed his empty plate away, sighed and pronounced "I am done."
    They were done playing and were picking up the toys when he arrived.
  3. (of an activity or task) Completed or finished.
    I'll text you when the movie's done.
  4. Being exhausted or fully spent.
    When the water is done we will only be able to go on for a few days.
  5. Without hope or prospect of completion or success.
    He is done, after three falls there is no chance he will be able to finish.
  6. Fashionable, socially acceptable, tasteful.
    I can't believe he just walked up and spoke to her like that, those kind of things just aren't done!
    What is the done thing these days? I can't keep up!
SynonymsEdit
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

done

  1. past participle of do
    I have done my work.
  2. (nonstandard, dialectal) simple past tense of do; did.
  3. (African-American Vernacular, Southern US, auxiliary verb, taking a past tense) Used in forming the perfective aspect; have.
    I woke up and found out she done left.
    • 2020, Moneybagg Yo, Thug Cry
      I done made some real bad choices with my life
  4. (obsolete) plural simple present of do
    • 1579, Edmund Spenser, The Shepheardes Calender
      The while their Foes done each of hem scorn.
    • 1606, Nathaniel Baxter, Sir Philip Sydneys Ourania, that is, Endimions Song and Tragedie, containing all Philosophie
      O you Caelestiall ever-living fires,
      That done inflame our hearts with high desires;
    • 1647, Henry More, The Praeexistency of the Soul
      The soul of Naboth lies to Ahab told,
      As done the learned Hebrew Doctours write,

InterjectionEdit

done

  1. Expresses that a task has been completed.
  2. Expresses agreement to and conclusion of a proposal, a set of terms, a sale, a request, etc.
    • 1994, René Echevarria, “Firstborn”, in Star Trek: The Next Generation, season 7, episode 21:
      Riker: Would you be interested in selling me the ore you're carrying? / Yog: No. I have a buyer. / Riker: You haven't heard my offer. Half a gram of Anjoran biomimetic gel. / Yog: Done.
SynonymsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

done (uncountable)

  1. (slang) Clipping of methadone.
    on the done

Etymology 3Edit

NounEdit

done (plural dones)

  1. Alternative form of dhoni

AnagramsEdit


BasqueEdit

AdjectiveEdit

done (not comparable)

  1. holy

CzechEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

done

  1. vocative singular of don

AnagramsEdit


DogribEdit

NounEdit

done

  1. person

Middle EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old French don.

NounEdit

done

  1. (rare) gift, present
    • 1470–1483 (date produced), Thomas Malory, “[Launcelot and Guinevere]”, in Le Morte Darthur (British Library Additional Manuscript 59678), [England: s.n.], folio 446, verso, lines 1–6:
      Than cam In ẜ Aſcamour and ẜ Grūmor ⁊ GrūmorſonCroſſelemeSeuerauſe le brewſe that was called a paſſynge ſtronge knyght for as the booke ſeyth the chyff lady of the lady off the lake feſted ẜ Launcelot and ẜ Seu[er]auſe le brewſe And whan ſhe had feſted them both at ſundry tymes ſhe þ[ra]yde hem to gyff her a done
      Then came in Sir Astamor, and Sir Gromere, Grummor’s son, Sir Crosselm, Sir Servause le Breuse, that was called a passing strong knight, for as the book saith, the chief Lady of the Lake feasted Sir Launcelot and Servause le Breuse, and when she had feasted them both at sundry times she prayed them to give her a boon.

Etymology 2Edit

NounEdit

done

  1. Alternative form of dynne

SpanishEdit

VerbEdit

done

  1. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of donar.
  2. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of donar.
  3. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of donar.

VenetianEdit

NounEdit

done

  1. plural of dona