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See also: infra-

Contents

EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Borrowed from Latin infra, below

AdverbEdit

infra (not comparable)

  1. (law) Used to refer to something discussed later.
AntonymsEdit
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Shortened form of infrastructure

NounEdit

infra (plural infras)

  1. (civil engineering, informal) Infrastructure.

AnagramsEdit


IstriotEdit

PrepositionEdit

infra

  1. among
    • 1877, Antonio Ive, Canti popolari istriani: raccolti a Rovigno, volume 5, Ermanno Loescher, page 40:
      Ti me pari oûna dea infra li dai,
      You seem to me a goddess among the gods,

ItalianEdit

AdverbEdit

infra

  1. Only used in the phrase vedi infra.

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

Adverb contracted from the ablative īnferā (parte), of īnferus.

PronunciationEdit

(Classical) IPA(key): /ˈin.fraː/, [ˈĩː.fraː]

AdverbEdit

īnfrā (not comparable)

  1. below

AntonymsEdit

PrepositionEdit

īnfrā

  1. (with accusative) below

AntonymsEdit

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • infra in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • infra in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • du Cange, Charles (1883), “infra”, in G. A. Louis Henschel, Pierre Carpentier, Léopold Favre, editors, Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (in Latin), Niort: L. Favre
  • infra” in Félix Gaffiot’s Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette (1934)
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • to feel superior to the affairs of life: res humanas infra se positas arbitrari
    • to consider a thing beneath one's dignity: aliquid infra se ducere or infra se positum arbitrari
    • as I said above: ut supra (opp. infra) diximus, dictum est