innocence

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Old French inocence, from Latin innocentia.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

innocence (uncountable)

  1. Absence of responsibility for a crime.
    Her attorney managed to convince the jury of her innocence.
  2. Lack of understanding about sensitive subjects such as sexuality and crime.
    • 1963, Margery Allingham, chapter 9, The China Governess[1]:
      Eustace gaped at him in amazement. When his urbanity dropped away from him, as now, he had an innocence of expression which was almost infantile. It was as if the world had never touched him at all.
    In his innocence, he offered the stranger to bring the package to Paris, never suspecting it contained drugs.
  3. Lack of ability or intention to harm or damage.
    Tests have demonstrated the innocence of this substance.

AntonymsEdit

  • (absence of responsibility for a crime): guilt
  • (absence of ability to harm): harmfulness

SynonymsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

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FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Old French inocence, from Latin innocentia.

NounEdit

innocence f (plural innocences)

  1. innocence

Related termsEdit

Last modified on 13 April 2014, at 06:44