invariable

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

in- +‎ variable

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

invariable (not comparable)

  1. Not variable; unalterable; uniform; always having the same value.
    • 1860, Isaac Taylor, Ultimate Civilisation
      Physical laws which are invariable.
    • 1907 August, Robert W[illiam] Chambers, chapter IX, in The Younger Set, New York, N.Y.: D. Appleton & Company, OCLC 24962326:
      “A tight little craft,” was Austin’s invariable comment on the matron; and she looked it, always trim and trig and smooth of surface like a converted yacht cleared for action.
  2. (mathematics) Constant.
  3. (by extension, grammar, of a word, or a grammatical class) That cannot undergo inflection, conjugation or declension.
    The French adjective marron ‘brown’ is invariable: it does not take the usual s in the plural.
    Synonym: uninflectable
    Hyponyms: indeclinable, inconjugable

QuotationsEdit

TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

invariable (plural invariables)

  1. Something that does not vary; a constant.

See alsoEdit


CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

in- +‎ variable

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

invariable (masculine and feminine plural invariables)

  1. invariable

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

in- +‎ variable

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

invariable (plural invariables)

  1. invariable

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit


SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

in- +‎ variable

AdjectiveEdit

invariable (plural invariables)

  1. invariable

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit