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See also: irréfragable

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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin irrefrāgābilis, from refrāgor (oppose, contest).

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK, US) IPA(key): /ɪˈɹɛfɹəɡəb(ə)l/
  • (file)

AdjectiveEdit

irrefragable (comparative more irrefragable, superlative most irrefragable)

  1. Which cannot be refuted; indisputable, clearly right, incontrovertible. [from 16th c.]
    • 1885, Charlotte M. Yonge, Nuttie's Father, ch. 20:
      Bulfinch, a solicitor at Redcastle, came to him with irrefragable proofs of gross peculation on the part of the bailiff.
    • 1913, Jack London, John Barleycorn, ch. 19:
      [W]e didn't. That is the irrefragable fact. We didn't.
    • 2001 Jan. 14, Harold Evans, "Bookend: White House Book Club," New York Times (retrieved 18 Nov 2012):
      Lionel Trilling has cautioned us that an idea derived from reading is not a unitary, irrefragable thing but something modified in its transmission.

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