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EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From bra-ket notation invented by Paul Dirac, from bracket

NounEdit

 
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ket (plural kets)

  1. (physics) A vector, in Hilbert space, especially as representing the state of a quantum mechanical system; the complex conjugate of a bra; a ket vector. Symbolised by |...〉.
    A particular ket, say  , might be represented by a particular column vector. Its corresponding bra,  , would then be represented by the row vector which is the transpose conjugate of that column vector.

Etymology 2Edit

Compare Icelandic kjöt (flesh); akin to Swedish kött and Danish kjöd. The use of the term ket for "candy" or "sweets" probably derived from its use to describe sweet meats or as a deterrent to children.

NounEdit

ket (plural kets)

  1. (Northern England) Carrion; any filth.
  2. (Northumbria) Sweetmeats.
  3. (Geordie) A sweet, treat or candy.

ReferencesEdit

Etymology 3Edit

Abbreviation.

NounEdit

ket (uncountable)

  1. (colloquial) ketamine

Etymology 4Edit

NounEdit

ket (uncountable)

  1. (Scotland) matted wool

BretonEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ked/ before a vowel.
  • IPA(key): /ke/ before a consonant.

AdverbEdit

ket

  1. not
    N'ouzon ket petra eo. — I don't know what it is.

Usage notesEdit

Together with ne: ne ... ket. This is the same structure as French ne ... pas.


DutchEdit

NounEdit

ket m (plural ketten, diminutive ketje n)

  1. (Belgium, dialectal) a kid
  2. (Belgium, dialectal) a young guy

Derived termsEdit


IcelandicEdit

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

ket n (genitive singular kets, no plural)

  1. (regional, dated) meat

DeclensionEdit


IlocanoEdit

ConjunctionEdit

ket

  1. and