Last modified on 22 March 2015, at 13:33

filth

EnglishEdit

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EtymologyEdit

From Middle English filth, from Old English fȳlþ (foulness, filth), from Proto-Germanic *fūliþō (foulness, filth), from Proto-Germanic *fūlaz (foul, corrupt, dirty, vile), from Proto-Indo-European *pū- (rottenness, pus), equivalent to foul +‎ -th. Cognate with Dutch vuilte (filth). More at foul.

NounEdit

filth (uncountable)

  1. dirt; foul matter; that which soils or defiles
  2. smut; that which sullies or defiles the moral character; corruption; pollution
    • Tillotson
      to purify the soul from the dross and filth of sensual delights
  3. (UK, pejorative, slang) the police
  4. (US, agriculture, dated) weeds growing on pasture land
    Grampa remembers when he had to cut filth with a scythe.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit