See also: Lode, lodē, lodě, lòde, and løde

English edit

Etymology edit

Doublet of load, which has however become semantically restricted. The now-archaic lode continues the old sense of Old English lād (way, course, journey) but by the 19th century survived only dialectally in the sense of “watercourse”, as a technical term in mining, and in the compounds lodestone, lodestar.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

lode (plural lodes)

  1. (obsolete) A way or path; a road.
  2. (dialectal) A watercourse.
  3. (mining) A vein of metallic ore that lies within definite boundaries, or within a fissure.
    • 1967, Henry C. Berg, Edward Huntington Cobb, Metalliferous Lode Deposits of Alaska, page 14:
      The metals traditionally sought in the Bristol Bay region have been gold and copper, mostly in deposits near Lake Iliamna. An exception is a gold lode discovered about 1930 near Sleitat Mountain (4), where about $200 in gold was recovered from small quartz veins near the periphery of a small granitic intrusive body.
  4. (by extension) A rich source of supply.
    • 2019 September 25, Gary Stix, “Two Linguists Use Their Skills to Inspect 21,739 Trump Tweets”, in Scientific American[1]:
      In recent years, Jack Grieve of the department of English and linguistics at the University of Birmingham in England has embraced Twitter as a bountiful lode for looking at language-use patterns.

Related terms edit

Translations edit

Anagrams edit

Cimbrian edit

Noun edit

lode m

  1. cloth, fabric

References edit

  • Umberto Patuzzi, ed., (2013) Ünsarne Börtar, Luserna: Comitato unitario delle linguistiche storiche germaniche in Italia / Einheitskomitee der historischen deutschen Sprachinseln in Italien

Italian edit

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ˈlɔ.de/
  • Rhymes: -ɔde
  • Hyphenation: lò‧de

Etymology 1 edit

From Latin laudem, from the Proto-Indo-European root *lēwt-, *lēwdʰ- (song, sound), from *lēw- (to sound, resound, sing out).

Alternative forms edit

Noun edit

lode f (plural lodi)

  1. praise
    Synonym: elogio
    senza infamia e senza lode
    without infamy and without praise
Related terms edit

Further reading edit

  • lode in Treccani.it – Vocabolario Treccani on line, Istituto dell'Enciclopedia Italiana

Etymology 2 edit

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Noun edit

lode f pl

  1. plural of loda

Anagrams edit

Latvian edit

 lode on Latvian Wikipedia
 
Lode (1, 2)
 
Lodes (3)

Etymology 1 edit

Borrowed from Middle Low German lode (piece of lead (used as weight), plummet), or perhaps from an East Frisian word (compare Saterland Frisian Lood) or Middle Dutch lood, which all had the same meaning (compare German Lot (plummet, solder)), itself a borrowing from Celtic (originally meaning “easily melting metal”), ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *plewd- (to flow), whence also Latvian plūst (to stream, to flow). This borrowing is first attested in 17th-century dictionaries.[1]

Pronunciation edit

(file)

Noun edit

lode f (5th declension)

  1. (mathematics) sphere
    lodes diametrsdiameter of a sphere
    lodes rādiussradius of a sphere
    lodes tilpumsvolume of a sphere
  2. object with spherical form; (sports) ball
    zemes lode, zemeslodethe Earth Globe
    koka, dzelzs lodewood, iron ball
    grūst lodito push a ball
  3. bullet, cannonball
    iešaut kādam lodi krūtīsto shoot a bullet in someone's chest
    lielgabala lodecannonball
Declension edit
Derived terms edit

Etymology 2 edit

On the southernmost Livonian toponyms Dzintra Hirša mentions a lake Lúodis in Zarasai District Municipality, Lithuania (as well as Luõdes ezers and Luodezers in Latvia) connecting these with Livonian lūod (northwest) and mentioning Latvian lodes vējš (northwestern wind) as being from the same source.[2]

Noun edit

lode f (5th declension)

  1. (dialectal, usually attributively in the expression lodes vējš) northwest
    lodes vējšnorthwestern wind

References edit

  1. ^ Karulis, Konstantīns (1992), “lode”, in Latviešu Etimoloģijas Vārdnīca (in Latvian), Rīga: AVOTS, →ISBN
  2. ^ Dzintra Hirša, Lībieši un lībiešu izcelsmes vietvārdi Latvijā in Kersti Boiko's Lībieši – rakstu krājums, page 213

Norwegian Nynorsk edit

Adjective edit

lode

  1. neuter singular of loden

Slovak edit

Noun edit

lode

  1. inflection of loď:
    1. genitive singular
    2. nominative/accusative plural