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EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English dol, from Old English dāl (portion, share, division, allotment), from Proto-Germanic *dailą (part, deal), from Proto-Indo-European *dʰail- (part, watershed). Cognate with Albanian thelë (portion, piece) and Old Church Slavonic дѣлити (děliti, divide). More at deal.

VerbEdit

dole (third-person singular simple present doles, present participle doling, simple past and past participle doled)

  1. To distribute in small amounts; to share out small portions of a meager resource.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

dole

  1. Money or other goods given as charity.
    • Dryden
      So sure the dole, so ready at their call, / They stood prepar'd to see the manna fall.
    • Keble
      Heaven has in store a precious dole.
    • 1863, Sheridan Le Fanu, The House by the Churchyard:
      Devereux, indeed, being a fast man, with such acres as he inherited, which certainly did not reach a thousand, mortgaged pretty smartly, and with as much personal debt beside, of the fashionable and refined sort, as became a young buck of bright though doubtful expectations [] was beholden, not only for his fun, but, occasionally for his daily bread and even his liberty, to those benevolent doles.
  2. Distribution; dealing; apportionment.
    • Cleveland
      At her general dole, / Each receives his ancient soul.
  3. (informal) Payment by the state to the unemployed.
    I get my dole paid twice a week.
    I′ve been on the dole for two years now.
  4. A boundary; a landmark.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Halliwell to this entry?)
  5. (Britain, dialectal) A void space left in tillage.
SynonymsEdit
  • (payment by the state to the unemployed): pancrack (UK), pogey (Canada)
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English doell (grief), from Old French doel (compare French deuil), from Late Latin dolus, from Latin doleo.

NounEdit

dole (uncountable)

  1. (archaic) Sorrow or grief; dolour.
  2. (law, Scotland) Dolus.

AnagramsEdit


CzechEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): [ˈdolɛ]
  • (file)

AdverbEdit

dole

  1. down (at a lower place or position)

AntonymsEdit

Related termsEdit

See alsoEdit

NounEdit

dole m

  1. vocative/locative singular of důl

Further readingEdit


DutchEdit

FrenchEdit

LatinEdit

Lower SorbianEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈdɔlɛ/, [ˈdɔlə]

NounEdit

dole

  1. locative singular of doł

PolishEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

dole f

  1. nominative/accusative/vocative plural of dola

NounEdit

dole m inan

  1. locative/vocative singular of dół

Serbo-CroatianEdit

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /dôle/
  • Hyphenation: do‧le

AdverbEdit

dȍle (Cyrillic spelling до̏ле)

  1. down
  2. below

InterjectionEdit

dȍle (Cyrillic spelling до̏ле)

  1. down
    Dol(j)e s vladom!
    Down with the government!

YolaEdit

NounEdit

dole

  1. deal

ReferencesEdit

  • J. Poole W. Barnes, A Glossary, with Some Pieces of Verse, of the Old Dialect of the English Colony in the Baronies of Forth and Bargy (1867)

ZazakiEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): [doˈlə]
  • Hyphenation: do‧le

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

dole f

  1. lake

See alsoEdit