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See also: leð, leþ, and leth-

Contents

CornishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Brythonic *laïθ, borrowed from Latin lac, lactis.

NounEdit

leth m

  1. milk

Middle EnglishEdit

NounEdit

leth (plural leþes)

  1. Alternative form of lyth

ReferencesEdit


Old IrishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Celtic *letos, perhaps cognate with Latin latus (side), or from Proto-Celtic *ɸletos.[1]

Celtic cognates include Welsh lled (breadth, width, half), Middle Breton let, led (large), and Cornish les.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

leth n (genitive leith or leithe, nominative plural leth or leithe)

  1. half
  2. direction
  3. side

DeclensionEdit

Especially in meaning "half":

Neuter o-stem
Singular Dual Plural
Nominative lethN lethN lethL
Vocative lethN lethN lethL
Accusative lethN lethN lethL
Genitive leithL leth lethN
Dative leuthL lethaib lethaib
Initial mutations of a following adjective:
  • H = triggers aspiration
  • L = triggers lenition
  • N = triggers nasalization

Especially in meaning "side":

Neuter s-stem
Singular Dual Plural
Nominative lethN leitheN leitheL
Vocative lethN leitheN leitheL
Accusative lethN leitheN leitheL
Genitive leitheH leitheN leitheN
Dative leithL leithib leithib
Initial mutations of a following adjective:
  • H = triggers aspiration
  • L = triggers lenition
  • N = triggers nasalization

DescendantsEdit

MutationEdit

Old Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Nasalization
leth
also lleth after a proclitic
leth
pronounced with /l(ʲ)-/
leth
also lleth after a proclitic
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Matasović, Ranko (2009), “*letos”, in Etymological Dictionary of Proto-Celtic (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 9), Leiden: Brill, →ISBN, pages 238-239
  • leth” in Dictionary of the Irish Language, Royal Irish Academy, 1913–76.

Old SaxonEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *laiþaz.

NounEdit

lēth n

  1. an evil person or thing

DescendantsEdit

  • Middle Low German: lêt, leit
    • Westphalian:
      Münsterländer: leed (Westmünsterländisch)

Scottish GaelicEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Irish leth, from Proto-Celtic *letos, perhaps cognate with Latin latus (side), or from Proto-Celtic *ɸletos.[1]

Celtic cognates include Welsh lled (breadth, width, half), Middle Breton let, led (large), and Cornish les.

PronunciationEdit

NumeralEdit

leth

  1. half

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Matasović, Ranko (2009), “*letos”, in Etymological Dictionary of Proto-Celtic (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 9), Leiden: Brill, →ISBN, pages 238-239
  • Faclair Gàidhlig Dwelly Air Loidhne, Dwelly, Edward (1911), Faclair Gàidhlig gu Beurla le Dealbhan/The Illustrated [Scottish] Gaelic-English Dictionary (10th ed.), Edinburgh: Birlinn Limited, →ISBN
  • leth” in Dictionary of the Irish Language, Royal Irish Academy, 1913–76.