EnglishEdit

 
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Wikipedia

Etymology 1Edit

From Portuguese laca, from Hindi लाख (lākh)/Urdu لاکھ(lākh) or cognates in other Indo-Aryan languages, from Sanskrit लक्ष (lakṣa).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /læk/
    • (file)

NounEdit

lac (countable and uncountable, plural lacs)

  1. A resinous substance produced mainly on the banyan tree by the female of Kerria lacca, a scale insect.
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

NounEdit

lac (plural lacs)

  1. Alternative spelling of lakh

Etymology 3Edit

From Cadillac.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

lac (plural lacs)

  1. (slang) Clipping of Cadillac.
    Synonyms: caddie, caddy
    Last night I was driving around in my lac.
    • 1992, Big Mello, Bone Hard Zaggin, Rap-A-Lot Records, track 5. "Mac's Drive 'Lac's"
      Macs drive lacs.
    • 2005, “Drive Slow”, in Late Registration, performed by Kanye West:
      The candy gloss is immaculate, it's simply amazing / Them elbows poking wide on that candy ’Lac

Etymology 4Edit

From laceration.

PronunciationEdit

IPA(key): /læs/

NounEdit

lac (countable and uncountable, plural lacs)

  1. (medicine, colloquial) Laceration.
    hand lac

AnagramsEdit


AromanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin lacus (lake), from Proto-Italic *lakus, from Proto-Indo-European *lókus (lake, pool).

NounEdit

lac

  1. lake

DalmatianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin lacus (lake), from Proto-Italic *lakus, from Proto-Indo-European *lókus (lake, pool).

NounEdit

lac m

  1. lake

Franco-ProvençalEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin lacus (lake), from Proto-Italic *lakus, from Proto-Indo-European *lókus (lake, pool). Compare Aragonese laco, Catalan llac, Esperanto lago, French lac, Italian lago, Maltese lag, Portuguese lago, Romanian lac, Sardinian lagu, Spanish lago.

NounEdit

lac m

  1. lake

FrenchEdit

 
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Wikipedia fr

EtymologyEdit

From Middle French lac, from Old French lac, a replacement of earlier lai (pit, trench, ditch, grave, mere, pond) (see Old French lac). Generally inferred as a borrowing of Latin lacus (lake), from Proto-Italic *lakus, from Proto-Indo-European *lókus (lake, pool). Compare Aragonese laco, Catalan llac, Esperanto lago, Italian lago, Maltese lag, Portuguese lago, Romanian lac, Sardinian lagu, Spanish lago.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

lac m (plural lacs)

  1. lake

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


K'iche'Edit

NounEdit

lac

  1. (Classical K'iche') plate

LatinEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Italic *dlakts, from Proto-Indo-European *ǵlákt n (gen. *ǵlaktós) (compare Ancient Greek γάλα (gála, milk), Old Armenian կաթն (katʿn), Albanian dhallë (buttermilk), Waigali zōr (milk), Hittite [script needed] (galaktar, balm, resin)).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

lac n sg (genitive lactis); third declension

  1. milk
    Cum lacte nutricis.With the nurse's milk.
  2. for something sweet, pleasant
    In melle sunt linguae sitae vostrae atque orationes, lacteque; corda felle sunt lita, atque acerbo aceto.
    In honey your tongues and speeches are dipped, and in milk; your hearts are smeared with gall and with bitter vinegar. (Plautus)
    Ut mentes ... satiari velut quodam jucundioris disciplinae lacte patiantur.
    That minds may endure being satisfied as by the milk of a more pleasant discipline. (Quintilian)
  3. milky juice
    Lac herbae.Milk of a plant.
    cum lacte veneni.with poisonous milk.
    • c. 1st century BCE, Anonymous (formerly misattributed to Ovid), Nux
      Lamina mollis adhuc tenero dum lacte, quod intro est,
      nec mala sunt ulli nostra futura bono.
      As their nutshell still remains soft with something tenderly milky inside,
      my future fruits are not good to anyone.
  4. (poetic) milk-white color
    • 2 CE, Publius Ovidius Naso, Ars Amatoria I.290:
      Forte sub umbrosis nemorosae vallibus Idae
      candidus, armenti gloria, taurus erat,
      signatus tenui media inter cornua nigro;
      una fuit labes, cetera lactis erant.
      As fortune had it, in the shadowy valleys of forested Ida,
      there was a white bull, the glory of its herd,
      marked by slightly black colour between its horns;
      the blemish was (only) one, the rest were milk-white.

DeclensionEdit

Third-declension noun (neuter, imparisyllabic non-i-stem), singular only.

Case Singular
Nominative lac
Genitive lactis
Dative lactī
Accusative lac
Ablative lacte
Vocative lac

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.
Particularly: “Romance descendants seem to descend from the archaic/vulgar form lacte and not lac itself”

ReferencesEdit

  • lac in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • lac in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • lac in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • Carl Meißner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[2], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • (ambiguous) to imbibe error from one's mother's breasts: errorem cum lacte nutricis sugere (Tusc. 3. 1. 2)

NormanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French lac, from Latin lacus (lake), from Proto-Italic *lakus, from Proto-Indo-European *lókus (lake, pool).

NounEdit

lac m (plural lacs)

  1. (Jersey, geography) lake

Old EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *laiką, from *laiko- (play), compare *laikaną. Cognates include Old Norse leikr (whence Danish leg (game), Swedish leka (to play)), Gothic 𐌻𐌰𐌹𐌺𐍃 (laiks, dance).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

lāc n or f

  1. play, sport
  2. battle, strife
  3. gift, offering, sacrifice, booty; message
    • Hie drihtne lac begen brohton.
      They both brought an offering to the Lord.

DeclensionEdit

when neuter
when feminine

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit


Old FrenchEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Generally assumed to be a borrowing of Latin lacus (basin, tank, tub, reservoir, pond), displacing the native Old French lai (pit, grave, trench, mere, pond), inherited from the same Latin term, by the early 13th century. Latin lacus derives from Proto-Italic *lakus, from Proto-Indo-European *lókus (lake, pool),

The displacement of Old French lai may have been assisted by influence from early Middle English lac, lace (lake, pond, pool", also "pit, ditch, trench), from Old English lacu (pool, pond, lake), due to lac's sudden spread in Old French following the annexation of English controlled Normandy into the kingdom of France in 1204. A full-out borrowing of the term from Middle English rather than from the Latin is also not an impossibility, as the earliest attestations of Old French lac are in the Eadwine Psalter (written by Anglo-Saxon and Anglo-Norman scribes in England) and Erec and Enide (an Arthurian romance, whose author was heavily influenced by English, Anglo-Norman, and Celtic writings).

The Old Occitan lac, laz, latz (snare, noose", also "pit, hole), which some theorise as leading to the Old French form (with c), is actually derived from a different Latin root related to Old French laz (snare, noose, lace), and possibly conflated with Old High German lacha (ditch, trench, pool). See Italian lacca (hole, pit).

NounEdit

lac m (oblique plural las, nominative singular las, nominative plural lac)

  1. lake

DescendantsEdit

  • Middle French: lac
    • French: lac
    • Norman: lac (Jersey)

Old IrishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Celtic *laggos, from Proto-Indo-European *(s)leh₁g-.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

lac

  1. weak, feeble
  2. (hair) soft, smooth

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

MutationEdit

Old Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Nasalization
lac
also llac after a proclitic
lac
pronounced with /l(ʲ)-/
unchanged
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further readingEdit


RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin lacus (lake), from Proto-Italic *lakus, from Proto-Indo-European *lókus (lake, pool). Compare Aragonese laco, Catalan llac, Esperanto lago, French lac, Italian lago, Maltese lag, Portuguese lago, Sardinian lagu, Spanish lago.

NounEdit

lac n (plural lacuri)

  1. lake

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit


RomanschEdit

EtymologyEdit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

PronunciationEdit

  This entry needs pronunciation information. If you are familiar with the IPA then please add some!

NounEdit

lac m

  1. paint

SynonymsEdit


ZazakiEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Compare Middle Armenian լաճ (lač).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

lac m

  1. son[2]
    O lacê mıno.He is my son.
    Lacê to lacê mı rê vano.Your son says to my son.
  2. boy
    Çı lacê do rındo.What a beautiful boy.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Todd, Terry Lynn (2008), Brigitte Werner, editor, A Grammar of Dimili (also Known as Zaza)[1], Electronic edition, Giessen: Forum Linguistik in Eurasien e.V., page 145b
  2. ^ Keskin, Mesut (2010), “lac”, in Wörterverzeichnis Zazaki-Deutsch, Deutsch-Zazaki (PDF), page 9a