See also: LEED and Leed

EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English leed, lede, shortened variant of leden (language), from Old English lēoden (popular or national language, native tongue), from Old English lēod (people, nation). Cognate with Scots leed (language). More at lede.

NounEdit

leed (plural leeds)

  1. (Britain dialectal, Northern England, Scotland) Language; tongue.
  2. (Britain dialectal, Scotland) A national tongue (in contrast to a foreign language).
  3. (Britain dialectal, Scotland) The speech of a person or class of persons; form of speech; talk; utterance; manner of speaking or writing; phraseology; diction.

Related termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English lede, led, leod, variant of Middle English leth, leoth (song, poem), from Old English lēoþ (song, poem, ode, lay, verse), from Proto-Germanic *leuþą (song, lay, praise), from Proto-Indo-European *lēw- (to sound, resound, sing out). Cognate with Dutch lied (song), German Lied (song).

NounEdit

leed (plural leeds)

  1. (Britain dialectal, Scotland) A strain in a rhyme, song, or poem; refrain; flow.
  2. (Britain dialectal, Scotland) A constant or repeated line or verse; theme.
  3. (Britain dialectal, Scotland) Patter; rigmarole.
Related termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -eːt

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle Dutch lêet, from Old Dutch *lēth, from Proto-Germanic *laiþą.

NounEdit

leed n (uncountable)

  1. grief, sorrow
  2. harm

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle Dutch lêet, from Old Dutch lēth, from Proto-Germanic *laiþaz.

AdjectiveEdit

leed (comparative leder, superlative leedst)

  1. (Belgium) angry
  2. sad
InflectionEdit
Inflection of leed
uninflected leed
inflected lede
comparative leder
positive comparative superlative
predicative/adverbial leed leder het leedst
het leedste
indefinite m./f. sing. lede ledere leedste
n. sing. leed leder leedste
plural lede ledere leedste
definite lede ledere leedste
partitive leeds leders

Etymology 3Edit

See the etymology of the main entry.

VerbEdit

leed

  1. singular past indicative of lijden

AnagramsEdit


LuxembourgishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old High German leid. Cognate with German leid, Dutch leed.

PronunciationEdit

AdverbEdit

leed

  1. (in expressions) grievous; cumbersome
    Ech sinn et leed. — “I’m fed up with it.”
    Dat deet mer leed. — “I’m sorry.”
    Hatt deet mer leed. — “I pity her.”

Related termsEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old English lēode (people, men), plural of lēod (man, person) (masc.), also “nation, people group, ethnicity, nationality” (fem.), akin to Old Frisian liod, Old Saxon liud, Old Norse ljóðr, lýðr, Old High German liut, Dutch lieden, German Leute (people). Akin to Old English lēodan (to grow, spring forth).

NounEdit

leed (plural common noun and collective noun, plural leeds or leeden)

  1. People; persons collectively.
  2. Countrymen, compatriots; vassals.
  3. Man, person; human being.
  4. Race, nation; nationality; kindred.

Etymology 2Edit

Unknown

NounEdit

leed

  1. A copper kettle or caldron.
    • 14th century, Geoffrey Chaucer, The Canterbury Tales
      That stemed as a forneys of a leed

ScotsEdit

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

EtymologyEdit

From earlier leed, from Middle English lede, reduced form of leden, leoden (language), from Old English lēoden (national language", literally, "of the people), from Old English lēode (people). More at lede.

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

leed (plural leeds)

  1. language
Usage notesEdit
  • Commonly understood language, either literally or metaphorically:
    A daena speak the leed.

SpanishEdit

VerbEdit

leed

  1. (Spain) Informal second-person plural (vosotros or vosotras) affirmative imperative form of leer.

YolaEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English led, from Old English lēad, from Proto-West Germanic *laud.

NounEdit

leed

  1. lead

ReferencesEdit

  • Jacob Poole (1867) , William Barnes, editor, A glossary, with some pieces of verse, of the old dialect of the English colony in the baronies of Forth and Bargy, County of Wexford, Ireland, J. Russell Smith, →ISBN