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See also: Leath

Contents

IrishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Irish leth (side), from Proto-Celtic *letos, perhaps cognate with Latin latus (side), or from Proto-Celtic *ɸletos.[1]

Celtic cognates include Welsh lled (breadth, width, half), Middle Breton let, led (large), and Cornish les.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

leath f (genitive singular leithe, nominative plural leatha)

  1. side; part, direction
  2. half; part, portion
    Is fearr leath ná meath.Something is better than nothing.
    —Proverb

DeclensionEdit

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

VerbEdit

leath (present analytic leathann, future analytic leathfaidh, verbal noun leathadh, past participle leata) (transitive, intransitive)

  1. disperse, spread, cover
  2. open wide, expand
  3. become confused, indistinct
  4. perish
  5. (literary) halve, divide, split (in half); diminish

ConjugationEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Matasović, Ranko (2009), “*letos”, in Etymological Dictionary of Proto-Celtic (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 9), Leiden: Brill, →ISBN, pages 238-239
  • leth” in Dictionary of the Irish Language, Royal Irish Academy, 1913–76.
  • “leaṫ” in Foclóir Gaeḋilge agus Béarla, Irish Texts Society, 2nd ed., 1927, by Patrick S. Dinneen.
  • "leath" in Foclóir Gaeilge-Béarla, An Gúm, 1977, by Niall Ó Dónaill.