See also: Let, -let, lét, lèt, lêt, łęt, Łęt, and лет

EnglishEdit

 
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Wikipedia

Alternative formsEdit

  • lett (archaic)
  • lettest (2nd person singular simple present and simple past; archaic)
  • letteth (3rd person singular simple present; archaic)

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English leten, læten, from Old English lǣtan (to allow, let go, bequeath, leave, rent), from Proto-West Germanic *lātan, from Proto-Germanic *lētaną (to leave behind, allow), from Proto-Indo-European *leh₁d- (to let, leave behind).

VerbEdit

let (third-person singular simple present lets, present participle letting, simple past let or (obsolete) leet, past participle let or (archaic) letten)

  1. (transitive) To allow to, not to prevent (+ infinitive, but usually without to).
    After he knocked for hours, I decided to let him come in.
  2. (transitive) To leave.
    Let me alone!
  3. (transitive) To allow the release of (a fluid).
    The physicians let about a pint of his blood, but to no avail.
  4. (transitive) To allow possession of (a property etc.) in exchange for rent.
    I decided to let the farmhouse to a couple while I was working abroad.
    • 1965, Roger Miller (lyrics and music), “King Of The Road”:
      Trailers for sale or rent, rooms to let, fifty cents.
  5. (transitive) To give, grant, or assign, as a work, privilege, or contract; often with out.
    to let the building of a bridge;  to let out the lathing and the plastering
  6. (transitive) Used to introduce an imperative in the first or third person.
    Let's put on a show!
    Let us have a moment of silence.
    Let me just give you the phone number.
    Let P be the point where AB and OX intersect.
  7. (transitive, obsolete except with know) To cause (+ bare infinitive).
    Can you let me know what time you'll be arriving?
    • 1485, Sir Thomas Malory, chapter IV, in Le Morte Darthur, book IV:
      Soo within a whyle kynge Pellinore cam with a grete hoost / and salewed the peple and the kyng / and ther was grete ioye made on euery syde / Thenne the kyng lete serche how moche people of his party ther was slayne / And ther were founde but lytel past two honderd men slayne and viij knyȝtes of the table round in their pauelions
    • 1818, John Keats, "To—":
      Time's sea hath been five years at its slow ebb, / Long hours have to and fro let creep the sand [].
Usage notesEdit
  • The use of “let” to introduce an imperative may sometimes be confused with its use, as its own imperative, in the sense of “to allow”. For example, the sentence “Let me go to the store.” could either be a second-person imperative of “let” (addressing someone who might prevent the speaker from going to the store) or a first-person singular imperative of “go” (not implying any such preventer).
SynonymsEdit
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

let (plural lets)

  1. The allowing of possession of a property etc. in exchange for rent.
    • 1854, Charles Dickens, Christmas Stories[1], page 317:
      Then he says “You would call it a Good Let, Madam?”
      “O certainly a Good Let sir.”

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English letten (to hinder, delay), from Old English lettan (to hinder, delay”; literally, “to make late), from Proto-West Germanic *lattjan, from Proto-Germanic *latjaną. Akin to Old English latian (to delay), Dutch letten, Old English læt (late). More at late, delay.

VerbEdit

let (third-person singular simple present lets, present participle letting, simple past letted, past participle let)

  1. (archaic) To hinder, prevent, impede, hamper, cumber; to obstruct (someone or something).
  2. (obsolete) To prevent someone from doing something; also to prevent something from happening.
    • 1526, William Tyndale, trans. Bible, Acts 8:
      And as they went on their waye, they cam unto a certayne water, and the gelded man sayde: Se here is water, what shall lett me to be baptised?
  3. (obsolete) To tarry or delay.

NounEdit

let (plural lets)

  1. An obstacle or hindrance.
    • 1567 Arthur Golding; Ovid's Metamorphoses Bk. 3 Lines 60-1
      And Cadmus saw his campanie make tarience in that sort
      He marveld what should be their let, and went to seeke them out.
    • 1603, Michel de Montaigne, chapter 16, in John Florio, transl., The Essayes [], book II, London: [] Val[entine] Simmes for Edward Blount [], OCLC 946730821:
      Paulus Emilius going to the glorious expedition of Macedon, advertised the people of Rome during his absence not to speake of his actions: For the licence of judgements is an especiall let in great affaires.
    • 1552, Hugh Latimer, the third sermon preached on the twenty-first Sunday after Trinity
      Consider whether your doings be to the let of your salvation or not.
  2. (tennis) The hindrance caused by the net during serve, only if the ball falls legally.
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit
ReferencesEdit

AnagramsEdit


CzechEdit

 
Czech Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia cs

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From letět.

NounEdit

let m

  1. flight (the act of flying)
DeclensionEdit
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

NounEdit

let

  1. genitive plural of léto

Further readingEdit

  • let in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • let in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989



DanishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Norse léttr, from Proto-Germanic *linhtaz, cognate with Swedish lätt, English light and German leicht.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

let (plural and definite singular attributive lette)

  1. light (not heavy)
  2. easy
  3. slight
  4. mild
InflectionEdit
Inflection of let
Positive Comparative Superlative
Common singular let lettere lettest2
Neuter singular let lettere lettest2
Plural lette lettere lettest2
Definite attributive1 lette lettere letteste
1) When an adjective is applied predicatively to something definite, the corresponding "indefinite" form is used.
2) The "indefinite" superlatives may not be used attributively.
SynonymsEdit
ReferencesEdit

AdverbEdit

let

  1. lightly
  2. easily
  3. slightly
  4. mildly

Etymology 2Edit

Abbreviation of letmælk.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

let c (singular definite letten, plural indefinite let)

  1. low-fat milk
InflectionEdit
ReferencesEdit

Etymology 3Edit

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

let

  1. imperative of lette

Etymology 4Edit

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

let

  1. past participle of le

DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

let

  1. first-, second- and third-person singular present indicative of letten
  2. imperative of letten

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English let.

PronunciationEdit

InterjectionEdit

let

  1. (tennis) indicates a let on service

Further readingEdit


FriulianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin lēctus, perfect passive participle of legō.

VerbEdit

let

  1. past participle of lei- read

GothicEdit

RomanizationEdit

lēt

  1. Romanization of 𐌻𐌴𐍄

IrishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

ContractionEdit

let (triggers lenition)

  1. (Munster) Contraction of le do (with your sg).
    let thoilplease

Related termsEdit


Norwegian BokmålEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Norse litr (colour), related to líta (to see)

NounEdit

let m (definite singular leten, indefinite plural leter, definite plural letene)

  1. colour
SynonymsEdit
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

VerbEdit

let

  1. imperative of lete

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Norse litr (colour), from Proto-Germanic *wlitiz, *wlituz. Related to Old Norse líta (to see)

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

let m (definite singular leten, indefinite plural leter or letar, definite plural letene or letane)

  1. colour
    Synonym: farge
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

VerbEdit

let

  1. present tense of la
  2. present tense of lata and late
  3. past tense of la
  4. past tense of lata and late

Etymology 3Edit

VerbEdit

let

  1. imperative of leta and lete

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


Serbo-CroatianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From lètjeti.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

lȇt m (Cyrillic spelling ле̑т)

  1. flight

DeclensionEdit

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • let” in Hrvatski jezični portal

SloveneEdit

EtymologyEdit

See the verb leteti (to fly)

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

lȅt m inan

  1. flight

InflectionEdit

Masculine inan., hard o-stem
nom. sing. lèt
gen. sing. léta
singular dual plural
nominative lèt léta léti
accusative lèt léta léte
genitive léta létov létov
dative létu létoma létom
locative létu létih létih
instrumental létom létoma léti

Tok PisinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From English leather.

NounEdit

let

  1. leather
  2. strap (of leather)
  3. belt

WestrobothnianEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Norse litr, from Proto-Germanic *wlitiz, *wlituz (appearance, look, aspect), from Proto-Indo-European *wel- (to see).

NounEdit

let m

  1. colour
  2. complexion
SynonymsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

VerbEdit

let

  1. preterite singular of låt