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EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English leyt, layt, leit, lait, from Old English līġet, līġetu, līeġet (lightning, flash of lightning), from Proto-Germanic *laugiþō (lightning), from Proto-Indo-European *leuk- (to shine). Related to Old English līeġ (fire, flame, lightning). Compare also Old High German laugazan, lōhazan (to be red, shine, sparkle), Gothic 𐌻𐌰𐌿𐌷𐌰𐍄𐌾𐌰𐌽 (lauhatjan, to lighten). More at lowe, light.

NounEdit

lait (countable and uncountable, plural laits)

  1. (obsolete) Lightning; flash of lightning; a flash.

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English laiten, leiten, from Old Norse leita (to seek, search, inquire), from Proto-Germanic *wlaitōną (to look out, see), from Proto-Indo-European *wel- (to see). Cognate with Norwegian Nynorsk leita (to search), Icelandic leita (to search), Swedish leta (to search, hunt, forage), Old English wlātian (to gaze, observe, look upon, behold).

Alternative formsEdit

VerbEdit

lait (third-person singular simple present laits, present participle laiting, simple past and past participle laited)

  1. (transitive, intransitive, Britain dialectal, obsolete) To seek; search for; inquire.
    • 1862, Song of Solomon, in Twenty-four English Dialects, page 282 (Westmorland dialect):
      By neeght, o' my bed, I laited him, at my sowl luvs : I laited him, but I dudn't find um.
    • 1877, John Frances, quoting a girl from the moorlands of Yorkshire, Notes and queries, page 10:
      The other day I heard a girl hailing from the moorlands of Yorkshire remark that she had "laited a long time for the children, but could not find them," evidently meaning she had sought for them. Is this word common to Yorkshire?
Derived termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


CimbrianEdit

NounEdit

lait f

  1. slope

ReferencesEdit

  • Umberto Patuzzi, ed., (2013) Ünsarne Börtar, Luserna: Comitato unitario delle linguistiche storiche germaniche in Italia / Einheitskomitee der historischen deutschen Sprachinseln in Italien

FinnishEdit

NounEdit

lait

  1. Nominative plural form of laki.

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

 
French Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia fr

EtymologyEdit

From Old French lait, from Vulgar Latin lactem (“milk”, masculine or feminine accusative), from Latin lac (“milk”, neuter), from Proto-Indo-European *ǵlákts. Compare Catalan llet, Friulian lat, Italian latte, Portuguese leite, Romanian lapte, Spanish leche, Walloon laecea.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

lait m (plural laits)

  1. milk

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

NounEdit

lait

  1. Alternative form of leyt

NormanEdit

 
Norman Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nrm

EtymologyEdit

From Old French lait, from Vulgar Latin lactem (“milk”, masculine or feminine accusative), from Latin lac (“milk”, neuter), from Proto-Indo-European *ǵlákts (milk).

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)

NounEdit

lait m (plural laits)

  1. milk

Derived termsEdit


OccitanEdit

NounEdit

lait m (plural laits)

  1. Alternative form of lach

Old FrenchEdit

Alternative formsEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Vulgar Latin lactem (“milk”, masculine or feminine accusative), from Latin lac (“milk”, neuter).

NounEdit

lait m (oblique plural laiz or laitz, nominative singular laiz or laitz, nominative plural lait)

  1. milk (white liquid produced by the mammary glands of mammals)
DescendantsEdit
  • French: lait
  • Norman: lait

Etymology 2Edit

Thought to be of Germanic origin; see Modern French laid.

AdjectiveEdit

lait m (oblique and nominative feminine singular laide)

  1. ugly
  2. horrific; awful; terrible
DeclensionEdit
DescendantsEdit

NounEdit

lait m (nominative singular laiz or laitz)

  1. ugliness

Etymology 3Edit

See laire

VerbEdit

lait

  1. third-person singular present indicative of laire

PiedmonteseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Vulgar Latin lactem (“milk”, masculine or feminine accusative), from Latin lac (“milk”, neuter).

NounEdit

lait m

  1. milk

Tok PisinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From English light.

NounEdit

lait

  1. light
    • 1989, Buk Baibel long Tok Pisin, Port Moresby: Bible Society of Papua New Guinea, 1:3:
      (please add an English translation of this quote)

AdjectiveEdit

lait

  1. bright
    • 1989, Buk Baibel long Tok Pisin, Port Moresby: Bible Society of Papua New Guinea, 3:24:
      (please add an English translation of this quote)

Related termsEdit

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