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See also: Levant

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EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Transferral use of Levant, from French levant. Compare French faire voile en Levant (to sail eastward), literally: set the sail with the Levant, an easterly wind that blows in the Mediterranean Sea.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /lɪˈvænt/
  • (file)

NounEdit

levant (plural levants)

  1. A disappearing or absconding after losing a bet.

VerbEdit

levant (third-person singular simple present levants, present participle levanting, simple past and past participle levanted)

  1. To abscond or run away, especially to avoid paying money or debts.
    • 1885, Sir Richard Burton, The Book of the Thousand Nights and One Night, Night 16:
      In a mighty little time their husbands played them false and, taking whatever they could lay hands upon, levanted and left them in the lurch.
    • 1922, James Joyce, Ulysses:
      He died of a Tuesday. Got the run. Levanted with the cash of a few ads.

TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From French levant.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

levant (not comparable)

  1. (heraldry) Rising, of an animal.
  2. (law) Rising or having risen from rest; said of cattle.
  3. (poetic) Eastern.
    • Milton
      Forth rush the levant and the ponent winds.

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Participle adjective of lever (to raise). Corresponds to Latin levāns, levāntem (raising), in reference to the rising of the sun; compare Italian levante.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

levant (feminine singular levante, masculine plural levants, feminine plural levantes)

  1. (of the moon, the sun, etc.) rising

NounEdit

levant m (uncountable)

  1. the east, the orient
    Synonym: orient
    Antonyms: ponant, occident

VerbEdit

levant

  1. present participle of lever

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit