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EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin līctor.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

lictor (plural lictors)

  1. An officer in ancient Rome, attendant on a consul or magistrate, who bore the fasces and was responsible for punishing criminals.
    • 1985, Anthony Burgess, Kingdom of the Wicked:
      ‘Beware the power of the mob, Caesar.’ Then, schooled in needful agility, he ran away before a lictor’s whip could reach him.

TranslationsEdit


LatinEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

līctor m (genitive līctōris); third declension

  1. lictor (officer in Ancient Rome)

InflectionEdit

Third declension.

Case Singular Plural
nominative līctor līctōrēs
genitive līctōris līctōrum
dative līctōrī līctōribus
accusative līctōrem līctōrēs
ablative līctōre līctōribus
vocative līctor līctōrēs

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • lictor in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • lictor in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • lictor” in Félix Gaffiot’s Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette (1934)
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • the lictors clear the way: lictores summovent turbam (Liv. 4. 50)
  • lictor in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • lictor in William Smith et al., editor (1890) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, London: William Wayte. G. E. Marindin

PortugueseEdit

 
Portuguese Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pt

NounEdit

lictor m (plural lictores)

  1. lictor (official in Ancient Rome)

SpanishEdit

 
Spanish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia es

NounEdit

lictor m (plural lictores)

  1. lictor (official in Ancient Rome)