Contents

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin lictor.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

lictor ‎(plural lictors)

  1. An officer in ancient Rome, attendant on a consul or magistrate, who bore the fasces and was responsible for punishing criminals.
    • 1985, Anthony Burgess, Kingdom of the Wicked:
      ‘Beware the power of the mob, Caesar.’ Then, schooled in needful agility, he ran away before a lictor’s whip could reach him.

TranslationsEdit


LatinEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

lictor m ‎(genitive lictōris); third declension

  1. lictor

InflectionEdit

Third declension.

Case Singular Plural
nominative lictor lictōrēs
genitive lictōris lictōrum
dative lictōrī lictōribus
accusative lictōrem lictōrēs
ablative lictōre lictōribus
vocative lictor lictōrēs

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit