officer

See also: Officer

EnglishEdit

 
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A group of customs officers

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English officer, from Anglo-Norman officer, officier, from Old French officer, Late Latin officiarius (official), from Latin officium (office) + -ārius (-er).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

officer (plural officers)

  1. One who has a position of authority in a hierarchical organization, especially in military, police or government organizations.
  2. A respectful term of address for an officer, especially a police officer.
    • 1918, W[illiam] B[abington] Maxwell, chapter XIX, in The Mirror and the Lamp, Indianapolis, Ind.: The Bobbs-Merrill Company, OCLC 4293071:
      Nothing was too small to receive attention, if a supervising eye could suggest improvements likely to conduce to the common welfare. Mr. Gordon Burnage, for instance, personally visited dust-bins and back premises, accompanied by a sort of village bailiff, going his round like a commanding officer doing billets.
  3. One who holds a public office.
  4. An agent or servant imparted with the ability, to some degree, to act on initiative.
  5. (colloquial, military) A commissioned officer.

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Central Dusun: upisor
  • Punjabi: ਅਫ਼ਸਰ (afasar)
  • Swahili: afisa

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

VerbEdit

officer (third-person singular simple present officers, present participle officering, simple past and past participle officered)

  1. (transitive) To supply with officers.
  2. (transitive) To command like an officer.
    • 1848 November – 1850 December, William Makepeace Thackeray, chapter 31, in The History of Pendennis. [], volume (please specify |volume=I or II), London: Bradbury and Evans, [], published 1849–1850, OCLC 2057953:
      Many of our journals are officered by Irish gentlemen, and their gallant brigade does the penning among us, as their ancestors used to transact the fighting in Europe; and engage under many a flag, to be good friends when the battle is over.

SynonymsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Anglo-Norman officer, officier, from Latin officiārius; equivalent to office +‎ -er.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ɔfiˈseːr/, /ˈɔfisər/

NounEdit

officer (plural officers)

  1. A hireling or subordinate; one employed to serve, especially at an estate.
  2. An official or officeholder; the holder of a prominent office or position.
  3. A municipal, local or societal official or officeholder.
  4. A religious or ecclesiastical official or officeholder.
  5. (religion) A deputy or subordinate of the forces of good or evil.
  6. (rare) One who supervises or organises jousting.
  7. (rare) A member or leader of a military force.

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Old FrenchEdit

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

officer m (oblique plural officers, nominative singular officers, nominative plural officer)

  1. officer

ReferencesEdit


SwedishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from French officer.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

officer c

  1. officer, a military person of fänrik grade or higher
  2. (archaic) ämbetsman, tjänsteman; one who holds a public office

DeclensionEdit

Declension of officer 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative officer officeren officerare officerarna
Genitive officers officerens officerares officerarnas

Derived termsEdit