See also: l’otü

BasqueEdit

EtymologyEdit

Perhaps from lohi (body, mud) +‎ -tu, but the semantics are unclear.[1]

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

lotu ? (present participle lotzen, future participle lotuko, short form lo, verbal noun lotze)

  1. to tie, to fasten
  2. to join, connect, bind
  3. to bind, bandage (wound)
  4. to associate, relate to, link to

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ lohi” in Etymological Dictionary of Basque by R. L. Trask, sussex.ac.uk

Further readingEdit

  • lotu in Euskaltzaindiaren Hiztegia, euskaltzaindia.eus
  • lotu” in Orotariko Euskal Hiztegia, euskaltzaindia.eus

FijianEdit

NounEdit

lotu

  1. religion

DescendantsEdit

  • Samoan: lotu

IcelandicEdit

NounEdit

lotu

  1. inflection of lota:
    1. indefinite accusative singular
    2. indefinite dative singular
    3. indefinite genitive singular

LatinEdit

NounEdit

lōtū

  1. ablative singular of lōtus

LinduEdit

NounEdit

lotu

  1. use

PolishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈlɔ.tu/
  • Rhymes: -ɔtu
  • Syllabification: lo‧tu

NounEdit

lotu m inan

  1. genitive singular of lot

SamoanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Fijian lotu.

NounEdit

lotu

  1. a church service
  2. a religious sect

See alsoEdit


Samoan Plantation PidginEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Fijian lotu (religion).

NounEdit

lotu

  1. church

ReferencesEdit

  • Ulrike Mosel, Tolai and Tok Pisin: the influence of the substratum on the development of New Guinea Pidgin (1980)

Tok PisinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Samoan Plantation Pidgin lotu, from Fijian lotu (religion).

NounEdit

lotu

  1. church
  2. religion

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • Ulrike Mosel, Tolai and Tok Pisin: the influence of the substratum on the development of New Guinea Pidgin (1980)

WallisianEdit

NounEdit

lotu

  1. religion