See also: Link

English edit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Middle English linke, lenke, from a merger of Old English hlenċe, hlenċa (ring; chainlink) and Old Norse *hlenkr, hlekkr (ring; chain); both from Proto-Germanic *hlankiz (ring; bond; fettle; fetter). Used in English since the 14th century. Related to lank.

Noun edit

link (plural links)

  1. A connection between places, people, events, things, or ideas.
    The mayor’s assistant serves as the link to the media.
  2. One element of a chain or other connected series.
    The third link of the silver chain needs to be resoldered.
    The weakest link.
  3. Abbreviation of hyperlink.
    The link on the page points to the sports scores.
  4. (computing) The connection between buses or systems.
    A by-N-link is composed of N lanes.
  5. (mathematics) A space comprising one or more disjoint knots.
  6. (Sussex) a thin wild bank of land splitting two cultivated patches and often linking two hills.
    • 2008, Richard John King, A Handbook for Travellers in Kent and Sussex:
      They used formerly to live in caves or huts dug into the side of a bank or "link," and lined with heath or straw.
  7. (figurative) an individual person or element in a system
    • 2010, James O. Young, My Sheep Know My Voice: anointed poetry, AuthorHouse, page 32:
      But know that God is the strongest link.
    • 2010, William Lidwell, Kritina Holden, Jill Butler, Universal Principles of Design, RockPort, page 262:
      The fuse is the weakest link in the system. As such, the fuse is also the most valuable link in the system.
    • 2010, Stephen Fairweather, The Missing Book of Genesis, AuthorHouse, page 219:
      [] This is so that nobody can change the way every link must talk about the formula that I taught to make a real Chain of Universal Love and not a Chain of Love of a group or sect.”
  8. Anything doubled and closed like a link of a chain.
    • 1707, J[ohn] Mortimer, The Whole Art of Husbandry; or, The Way of Managing and Improving of Land. [], 2nd edition, London: [] J[ohn] H[umphreys] for H[enry] Mortlock [], and J[onathan] Robinson [], published 1708, →OCLC:
      a link of horsehair
  9. A sausage that is not a patty.
  10. (kinematics) Any one of the several elementary pieces of a mechanism, such as the fixed frame, or a rod, wheel, mass of confined liquid, etc., by which relative motion of other parts is produced and constrained.
  11. (engineering) Any intermediate rod or piece for transmitting force or motion, especially a short connecting rod with a bearing at each end; specifically (in steam engines) the slotted bar, or connecting piece, to the opposite ends of which the eccentric rods are jointed, and by means of which the movement of the valve is varied, in a link motion.
  12. (surveying) The length of one joint of Gunter's chain, being the hundredth part of it, or 7.92 inches, the chain being 66 feet in length.
  13. (chemistry) A bond of affinity, or a unit of valence between atoms; applied to a unit of chemical force or attraction.
  14. (in the plural) The windings of a river; the land along a winding stream.
    • 1822, Allan Cunningham, “The King of the Peak”, in Traditional Tales of the English and Scottish Peasantry, volume 1, page 222:
      'Dame Foljambe,' said the old man, 'the march of thy tale is like the course of the Wye, seventeen miles of links and windings down a fair valley five miles long. [] '
  15. (broadcasting) An introductory cue.
    • 2002, Carole Fleming, The Radio Handbook, page 53:
      Too much talk on a music-based station can cause listeners who tune in for the music to go elsewhere. [] 'Some people will say “your link has to be 45 seconds long” but I don't do that,' explains the programme controller of Trent FM, Dick Stone.
Synonyms edit
Hyponyms edit
Holonyms edit
  • (element of a connected series): chain
Derived terms edit
Translations edit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Verb edit

link (third-person singular simple present links, present participle linking, simple past and past participle linked)

  1. (transitive) To connect two or more things.
    • 1813, John Chetwode Eustace, A Tour Through Italy:
      All the tribes and nations that composed it [the Roman Empire] were linked together, not only by the same laws and the same government, but by all the facilities of commodious intercourse, and of frequent communication.
  2. (intransitive, of a Web page) To contain a hyperlink to another page.
    My homepage links to my wife's.
  3. (transitive, Internet) To supply (somebody) with a hyperlink; to direct by means of a link.
    Haven't you seen his Web site? I'll link you to it.
  4. (transitive, Internet) To post a hyperlink to.
    Stop linking those unfunny comics all the time!
  5. (transitive) To demonstrate a correlation between two things.
  6. (software compilation) To combine objects generated by a compiler into a single executable.
  7. (transitive, slang) To meet with someone.
Synonyms edit
Derived terms edit
Translations edit

Etymology 2 edit

Plausibly a modification of Medieval Latin linchinus (candle), an alteration of Latin lynchinus, itself from Ancient Greek λύχνος (lúkhnos, lamp).

Noun edit

link (plural links)

  1. (obsolete) A torch, used to light dark streets.
Derived terms edit
Translations edit

Etymology 3 edit

Unknown.

Verb edit

link (third-person singular simple present links, present participle linking, simple past and past participle linked)

  1. (Scotland, intransitive) To skip or trip along smartly; to go quickly.
    • 1902, John Buchan, The Outgoing of the Tide:
      On a sudden he was aware of a man linking along at his side. He cried a fine night, and the man replied.
Translations edit

See also edit

References edit

  • Webster's Seventh New Collegiate Dictionary, Springfield, Massachusetts, G.&C. Merriam Co., 1967

Anagrams edit

Chinese edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From English link.

Pronunciation edit


Noun edit

link

  1. (Hong Kong Cantonese, computing) hyperlink (Classifier: c)

Verb edit

link

  1. (Hong Kong Cantonese, computing) to link; to add a hyperlink

Czech edit

 
Czech Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia cs

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

link m inan

  1. link, hyperlink

Declension edit

Further reading edit

  • link in Kartotéka Novočeského lexikálního archivu
  • link in Internetová jazyková příručka

Danish edit

 
Danish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia da

Etymology edit

Borrowed from English link (since 1995).

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

link n (singular definite linket, plural indefinite link or links)

  1. link (hyperlink)

Inflection edit

Synonyms edit

Dutch edit

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Adjective edit

link (comparative linker, superlative linkst)

  1. dangerous
  2. (criminal slang) sly; cunning
  3. (slang) jolly, nice
Inflection edit
Declension of link
uninflected link
inflected linke
comparative linker
positive comparative superlative
predicative/adverbial link linker het linkst
het linkste
indefinite m./f. sing. linke linkere linkste
n. sing. link linker linkste
plural linke linkere linkste
definite linke linkere linkste
partitive links linkers
Derived terms edit

Etymology 2 edit

Borrowed from English link, only since late 20th century.

Noun edit

link m (plural links, diminutive linkje n)

  1. physical connection, as in a hardware cable
  2. (figuratively) logical connection, as in reasoning about causality
  3. hyperlink
Synonyms edit
Derived terms edit

References edit

  • M. J. Koenen & J. Endepols, Verklarend Handwoordenboek der Nederlandse Taal (tevens Vreemde-woordentolk), Groningen, Wolters-Noordhoff, 1969 (26th edition) [Dutch dictionary in Dutch]

German edit

Etymology edit

From Middle High German linc, from Old High German *link; compare Old High German linka (the left hand).

Pronunciation edit

Adjective edit

link (strong nominative masculine singular linker, comparative linker, superlative am linkesten or am linksten)

  1. (only attributive and not comparable) left
    auf der linken Seiteon the left
    ihr linker Fußher left foot
  2. (colloquial) untrustworthy
  3. (colloquial) dubious, wrong, disreputable, questionable
  4. (colloquial) sly, cunning

Declension edit

Further reading edit

  • link” in Duden online
  • link” in Digitales Wörterbuch der deutschen Sprache

Hungarian edit

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

Borrowed from English link.[1]

Noun edit

link (plural linkek)

  1. link, hyperlink
    Synonyms: hivatkozás, hiperhivatkozás
Declension edit
Inflection (stem in -e-, front unrounded harmony)
singular plural
nominative link linkek
accusative linket linkeket
dative linknek linkeknek
instrumental linkkel linkekkel
causal-final linkért linkekért
translative linkké linkekké
terminative linkig linkekig
essive-formal linkként linkekként
essive-modal
inessive linkben linkekben
superessive linken linkeken
adessive linknél linkeknél
illative linkbe linkekbe
sublative linkre linkekre
allative linkhez linkekhez
elative linkből linkekből
delative linkről linkekről
ablative linktől linkektől
non-attributive
possessive - singular
linké linkeké
non-attributive
possessive - plural
linkéi linkekéi
Possessive forms of link
possessor single possession multiple possessions
1st person sing. linkem linkjeim
2nd person sing. linked linkjeid
3rd person sing. linkje linkjei
1st person plural linkünk linkjeink
2nd person plural linketek linkjeitek
3rd person plural linkjük linkjeik

Etymology 2 edit

Borrowed from Yiddish לינק (link), from German link (left).[1]

Adjective edit

link (comparative linkebb, superlative leglinkebb)

  1. (colloquial) flighty, fickle, fishy, shifty, sleazy, phoney (unreliable, irresponsible, often dishonest)
    Synonyms: könnyelmű, léha, komolytalan, megbízhatatlan, szélhámos
    link alakcrook, loafer
    link dumabaloney, eyewash, claptrap, flannel
Declension edit
Inflection (stem in -e-, front unrounded harmony)
singular plural
nominative link linkek
accusative linket linkeket
dative linknek linkeknek
instrumental linkkel linkekkel
causal-final linkért linkekért
translative linkké linkekké
terminative linkig linkekig
essive-formal linkként linkekként
essive-modal
inessive linkben linkekben
superessive linken linkeken
adessive linknél linkeknél
illative linkbe linkekbe
sublative linkre linkekre
allative linkhez linkekhez
elative linkből linkekből
delative linkről linkekről
ablative linktől linkektől
non-attributive
possessive - singular
linké linkeké
non-attributive
possessive - plural
linkéi linkekéi
Derived terms edit

References edit

Further reading edit

  • (flighty, fickle, sleazy): link in Bárczi, Géza and László Országh. A magyar nyelv értelmező szótára (‘The Explanatory Dictionary of the Hungarian Language’, abbr.: ÉrtSz.). Budapest: Akadémiai Kiadó, 1959–1962. Fifth ed., 1992: →ISBN

Italian edit

 
Italian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia it

Etymology edit

Unadapted borrowing from English link.

Noun edit

link m (invariable)

  1. (computing) link (hyperlink)
    Synonym: collegamento

Derived terms edit

Lithuanian edit

Etymology edit

From a clipping of liñki, liñkui, or liñkuo, ultimately from the same root as liñkti (to tend), linkė́ti (to wish).[1]

Pronunciation edit

Preposition edit

lĩnk

  1. toward (used with genitive case)

References edit

  1. ^ Wojciech Smoczyński (2018) “liñk”, in Lithuanian Etymological Dictionary, Berlin, Germany: Peter Lang, →DOI, →ISBN, page 357

Pennsylvania German edit

Etymology edit

Compare German link.

Adjective edit

link

  1. left, left-hand

Polish edit

 
Polish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pl

Etymology edit

Borrowed from English link.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

link m inan

  1. (Internet) hyperlink, link (some text or a graphic in an electronic document that can be activated to display another document or trigger an action)
    Synonyms: hiperłącze, odnośnik, odsyłacz

Declension edit

Further reading edit

  • link in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • link in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Portuguese edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

Unadapted borrowing from English link.

Pronunciation edit

 

Noun edit

link m (plural links)

  1. (computing) link (text or a graphic that can be activated to open another document)
    Synonyms: hiperligação, ligação

Derived terms edit

Romanian edit

Etymology edit

Unadapted borrowing from English link.

Noun edit

link n (plural linkuri)

  1. link

Declension edit

Spanish edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from English link.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ˈlink/ [ˈlĩŋk]
  • Rhymes: -ink
  • Syllabification: link

Noun edit

link m (plural links)

  1. (computing) link (text or a graphic that can be activated to open another document)
    Synonym: enlace
    • 2019 April 8, Astrid Morales, “Nueva estafa busca robar credenciales de usuarios de Netflix”, in Prensa Libre[2]:
      En el link puede observarse que no hace referencia a la compañía y que el servidor corresponde a un servicio de hosting gratuito de Emiratos Árabes.
      At the link you can see that it does not reference the company and that the server belongs to a free hosting service from the [United] Arab Emirates.

Derived terms edit