EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English lo, loo, from Old English (exclamation of surprise, grief, or joy). Conflated in Middle English with lo! (interjection), a corruption of lok!, loke! (look!) (as in lo we! (look we!)). Cognate with Scots lo, lu (lo). See also look.

InterjectionEdit

lo

  1. (archaic) look, see, behold (in an imperative sense).
    • c. 1610-11, Shakespeare, William, The Tempest[1], act III, scene ii:
      Caliban: Lo, lo again! Bite him to death, I prithee.
    • 1925, Brewitt-Taylor, Charles Henry, Romance of the Three Kingdoms, translation of original by Luo Guanzhong:
      Emperor Ling went in state to the Hall of Virtue. As he drew near the throne, a rushing whirlwind arose in the corner of the hall and, lo! from the roof beams floated down a monstrous black serpent that coiled itself up on the very seat of majesty. The Emperor fell in a swoon.
    • 1959, Anthony Burgess, Beds in the East (The Malayan Trilogy), published 1972, page 588:
      "Tambi will be here in..." He computed carefully. "... in exactly twenty seconds." And, lo, Tambi appeared at that very moment.
SynonymsEdit
Related termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Variant of low.

AdjectiveEdit

lo (not comparable)

  1. Informal spelling of low.
Derived termsEdit
Related termsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

ContractionEdit

lo

  1. (colloquial) hello ('lo; see hallo)

AnagramsEdit


AragoneseEdit

PronounEdit

lo

  1. him (direct object)

AsturianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Vulgar Latin *lo, *illu, from Latin illud, neuter of ille.

ArticleEdit

lo n sg (masculine el, feminine la, masculine plural los, feminine plural les)

  1. (definite) the

PronounEdit

lo

  1. it (third-person singular neuter direct pronoun)

BasqueEdit

NounEdit

lo inan

  1. sleep

Derived termsEdit


CatalanEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Vulgar Latin *illu, from Latin illum, accusative of ille.

PronounEdit

lo (enclitic, contracted 'l, proclitic el, contracted proclitic l')

  1. him (direct object)

DeclensionEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Latin illum, from ille.

ArticleEdit

lo m (feminine la, masculine plural los, feminine plural les)

  1. (archaic or dialectal) the (definite article)
    Synonym: el (standard)

Further readingEdit


ChickasawEdit

PronounEdit

lo

  1. I

ChineseEdit

PronunciationEdit


NounEdit

lo

  1. (neologism, mostly in compounds) Lolita fashion
    lo  ―  lo niáng  ―  a girl who regularly dresses in lolita fashion

Derived termsEdit


CornishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Brythonic *lluɨɣ, from Proto-Celtic *lēgā. Cognate with Welsh llwy, Breton loa (Vannes dialect loé, lui).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

lo f (plural loyow)

  1. spoon

EsperantoEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

lo (accusative singular lo-on, plural lo-oj, accusative plural lo-ojn)

  1. The name of the Latin-script letter L.

See alsoEdit


GalicianEdit

Etymology 1Edit

See o. Compare Portuguese lo.

ArticleEdit

lo m sg (feminine singular la, masculine plural los, feminine plural las)

  1. Alternative form of o (the, masculine singular)
    Para seres forte debes come-lo caldo.
    You must eat the broth for growing strong.
Usage notesEdit

The l- forms of article are compulsorily used after the preposition por and adverb u. It is optional when the preceding word ends in -r or -s, after unstressed pronouns nos, vos and lles (when they are enclitc) of ambos, entrambos, todos, tras and copulative conjunction (e mais and tonic pronouns vós and nós followed by a numerical precision).

Related termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

PronounEdit

lo m (accusative)

  1. Alternative form of o (him)
Usage notesEdit

The l- forms of accusative third-person pronouns are used when the preceding word ends in -r or -s, and is suffixed to the preceding word.

Related termsEdit

IdoEdit

EtymologyEdit

Back-formation from co (this), to (that), based on la (the), ol (it).[1]

PronunciationEdit

PronounEdit

lo

  1. referring to a previous sentence or phrase, i.e. a fact rather than an object; it, the
    Il esas mortinta de tri monati, e vu ne savas lo!
    He's been dead for three months, and you didn't know it (that he's been dead for three months)!

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Progreso, VI, 238

IndonesianEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Betawi Kota lo (you), from Hokkien (). Doublet of lu.

PronounEdit

lo

  1. (chiefly Jakarta, slang) Second-person singular pronoun: you, your, yours
    Oke, kalau lo baper, yuk cabut.[1]OK, if you are sensitive, let's go!

SynonymsEdit

Indonesian informal second-person pronouns:

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ 2018, Yuni Astuti, Saipeh Baper, CV Jejak (Jejak Publisher) (→ISBN), page 53:

Etymology 2Edit

InterjectionEdit

lo

  1. Alternative spelling of loh.

ParticleEdit

lo

  1. Alternative spelling of loh.

Further readingEdit


InterlinguaEdit

PronounEdit

lo

  1. it, that (direct object)
    Tu lo audi? – Do you hear it?

Related termsEdit


ItalianEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From a Vulgar Latin *illu, from Latin illum, illud, the accusative singular of ille, by dropping il- and -m. [1]

ArticleEdit

Italian Definite Articles
singular plural
masculine il
lo/l'
i
gli
feminine  la/l' le

lo m sg (plural gli)

  1. The form of il that is used before the so-called impure consonants, that is, s+consonant (impure s), gn, pn, ps, x or z; before a vowel it becomes l'; the
    l’ossothe bone
    lo statothe state
    lo ziothe uncle

Etymology 2Edit

From Latin illum, the accusative singular of ille.

Alternative formsEdit

PronounEdit

lo m sg (plural li, female la)

  1. (accusative) him
    Lo conosci?Do you know him?
  2. (accusative) it, this or that thing
    Synonym: ciò
    Quando te lo diedi.When I gave it to you.
See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Patota, Giuseppe (2002) Lineamenti di grammatica storica dell'italiano (in Italian), Bologna: il Mulino, →ISBN, page 123

JapaneseEdit

RomanizationEdit

lo

  1. Rōmaji transcription of ろ゚
  2. Rōmaji transcription of ロ゚

LaboyaEdit

VerbEdit

lo

  1. to go
    Synonyms: kako, attu

ReferencesEdit

  • Rina, A. Dj.; Kabba, John Lado B. (2011) , “lo”, in Kamus Bahasa Lamboya, Kabupaten Sumba Bakat [Dictionary of Lamboya Language, West Sumba Regency], Waikabubak: Dinas Kebudayaan dan Pariwisata, Kabupaten Sumba Bakat, page 60

LashiEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Sino-Tibetan *la-j ~ ra. Cognates include Chinese (lái) and Burmese လာ (la).

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

lo

  1. to come

SynonymsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • Hkaw Luk (2017) A grammatical sketch of Lacid[2], Chiang Mai: Payap University (master thesis)

LolopoEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Loloish *ʔ-l(y)a¹ (Bradley), from Proto-Sino-Tibetan. Cognate with Sichuan Yi (hxa nie), Burmese လျှာ (hlya), S'gaw Karen ပျ့ၤ (plaȳ), Tedim Chin lei², Drung pvlai, Chepang ले (le).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

lo 

  1. (Yao'an) tongue

LuxembourgishEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdverbEdit

lo

  1. Alternative form of elo

MalagasyEdit

AdjectiveEdit

lo

  1. rotten, spoiled

MandarinEdit

RomanizationEdit

lo (Zhuyin ˙ㄌㄛ)

  1. Pinyin transcription of

Usage notesEdit

  • Almost all syllables transliterated from Chinese speech contain one of four diacritics indicating tone. This is one of the few syllables in the Chinese language that is transcribed only in a toneless form.

Middle DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Dutch *lō, from Proto-Germanic *lauhaz.

NounEdit

 f or n

  1. clearing in a forest

InflectionEdit

This noun needs an inflection-table template.

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Dutch: lo (obsolete outside toponyms)

Further readingEdit

  • loo”, in Vroegmiddelnederlands Woordenboek, 2000
  • Verwijs, E.; Verdam, J. (1885–1929) , “loo”, in Middelnederlandsch Woordenboek, The Hague: Martinus Nijhoff, →ISBN, page loo

NeapolitanEdit

PronounEdit

lo

  1. Alternative form of 'o

Norwegian BokmålEdit

NounEdit

lo n (definite singular loet, uncountable)

  1. lint

Derived termsEdit

VerbEdit

lo

  1. past of le

Norwegian NynorskEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Confer with Icelandic . May have something to do with Old Norse lagðr.

NounEdit

lo f (definite singular loa, indefinite plural loer, definite plural loene)

  1. woollen hairs that shed off knitted or woven fabrics
Derived termsEdit
See alsoEdit

Etymology 2Edit

 
Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nn

From Old Norse , lóa.

NounEdit

lo f (definite singular loa, indefinite plural loer, definite plural loene)

  1. any of various birds of the family Charadriidae, the plovers and dotterels
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

From Old Norse lóð f or n.

NounEdit

lo f (definite singular loa, indefinite plural loer, definite plural loene)

  1. (agriculture) a harvested (especially grain), that has been cut but not threshed
  2. (agriculture, collective) grain, husk and straw
  3. (agriculture) a grain harvest
  4. (agriculture, collective) hay

Etymology 4Edit

From Old Norse  f or n (a clearing in the forest).

NounEdit

lo f (definite singular loa, indefinite plural loer, definite plural loene)

  1. Used in placenames: meadow
    Synonyms: grasslette, eng
Related termsEdit

Etymology 5Edit

From Dutch and or Middle Low German.

NounEdit

lo m (definite singular loen, indefinite plural loar, definite plural loane)

  1. (nautical) part of a vessel whose side faces the wind
SynonymsEdit
AntonymsEdit

AdjectiveEdit

lo (singular and plural lo)

  1. located or situated on the windy side

See alsoEdit

Etymology 6Edit

From Middle Low German lot (genitive lodes). Doublet of lodd.

NounEdit

lo f (definite singular loa, indefinite plural loer, definite plural loene)

  1. a shotgun shell
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 7Edit

Akin to Icelandic löð.

NounEdit

lo f (definite singular loa, indefinite plural loer, definite plural loene)

  1. a tool used to form the head of nails
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 8Edit

Of unknown origin.

NounEdit

lo n (definite singular loet, indefinite plural lo, definite plural loa)

  1. natural fertilizer
  2. dung

Etymology 9Edit

See the etymology of the main entry.

VerbEdit

lo

  1. past tense of le

Etymology 10Edit

See the etymology of the main entry.

VerbEdit

lo

  1. imperative of loa and loe

ReferencesEdit

AnagramsEdit


NovialEdit

PronounEdit

lo (genitive lon, plural los)

  1. he; him

Related termsEdit


OccitanEdit

Alternative formsEdit

  • lou (Mistralian)
  • le (Toulouse, Massat)
  • eth (Gascon)

EtymologyEdit

From Old Occitan lo, from Vulgar Latin *lo, *illu, from Latin illum.

ArticleEdit

lo (feminine la, masculine plural los, feminine plural las)

  1. the; masculine singular definite article

Usage notesEdit

  • In the Provençal dialect, the masculine and feminine plural is lei.

Old FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Vulgar Latin *lo, *illu, from Latin illum; compare Old Occitan lo.

ArticleEdit

lo

  1. (9th and 10th centuries) Alternative form of le; masculine singular oblique definite article

PronounEdit

lo

  1. (9th and 10th centuries) Alternative form of le; masculine singular object pronoun

Old OccitanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Vulgar Latin *lo, *illu, from Latin illum; compare Old French lo.

ArticleEdit

lo (feminine la)

  1. the; masculine singular definite article

DescendantsEdit

  • Occitan: lo

PapiamentuEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Portuguese logo ("soon") and Spanish luego ("soon, later").

VerbEdit

lo

Indicates the future tense of a verb.

  1. shall
  2. will

PhaluraEdit

Etymology 1Edit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

PronunciationEdit

DeterminerEdit

lo (demonstrative, Perso-Arabic spelling لوۡ)

  1. that (agr: dist nom masc sg)

ReferencesEdit

  • Liljegren, Henrik; Haider, Naseem (2011) Palula Vocabulary (FLI Language and Culture Series; 7)‎[3], Islamabad, Pakistan: Forum for Language Initiatives, →ISBN

Etymology 2Edit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

PronunciationEdit

PronounEdit

lo (demonstrative, Perso-Arabic spelling لوۡ)

  1. it
  2. he (dist masc nom)

ReferencesEdit

  • Liljegren, Henrik; Haider, Naseem (2011) Palula Vocabulary (FLI Language and Culture Series; 7)‎[4], Islamabad, Pakistan: Forum for Language Initiatives, →ISBN

PortugueseEdit

EtymologyEdit

See o.

PronunciationEdit

PronounEdit

lo

  1. Alternative form of o (third-person masculine singular objective pronoun) used as an enclitic and mesoclitic following a verb form ending in a consonant (-z, -r and -s, but not -m); the consonant is elided and the preceding vowel takes an accent if necessary
    Contá-lo (contar)To tell it.
    Contámo-lo (contamos)We told it.
    Fi-lo (fiz)I did it.

Coordinate termsEdit

  • no (following a nasal vowel), o (following an oral vowel)

See alsoEdit

Portuguese personal pronouns (edit)
Number Person Nominative
(subject)
Accusative
(direct object)
Dative
(indirect object)
Prepositional Prepositional
with com
Non-declining
m f m f m and f m f m f m f
Singular First eu me mim comigo
Second tu te ti contigo você
o senhor a senhora
Third ele ela o
(lo, no)
a
(la, na)
lhe ele ela com ele com ela o mesmo a mesma
se si consigo
Plural First nós nos nós connosco (Portugal)
conosco (Brazil)
a gente
Second vós vos vós convosco, com vós vocês
os senhores as senhoras
Third eles elas os
(los, nos)
as
(las, nas)
lhes eles elas com eles com elas os mesmos as mesmas
se si consigo
Indefinite se si consigo

RomanschEdit

Alternative formsEdit

  • (Rumantsch Grischun, Sursilvan) lad

EtymologyEdit

From Latin lātus.

AdjectiveEdit

lo m (feminine singular loa, masculine plural los, feminine plural loas)

  1. (Sutsilvan) wide, broad

SynonymsEdit

  • (Rumantsch Grischun, Sursilvan, Sutsilvan, Surmiran) lartg
  • (Puter, Vallader) larg

SilesianEdit

PrepositionEdit

lo

  1. by, at, on
  2. to
  3. for

Southern NdebeleEdit

Etymology 1Edit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

PronounEdit

lo

  1. this; class 1 proximal demonstrative.

Etymology 2Edit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

PronounEdit

lo

  1. this; class 3 proximal demonstrative.

SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From a Vulgar Latin *lo, *illu. Masculine pronoun from Latin illum, singular masculine accusative of ille. Neuter article and pronoun form from Latin illud, neuter of ille. Compare Portuguese o.

PronunciationEdit

ArticleEdit

lo

  1. neuter definite article used to make abstract nouns from adjectives; the
    lo pobrethe poorness / poor thing (about)

PronounEdit

lo

  1. accusative of él, ello, and usted (when referring to a man); him, it, you (formal)
    lo veoI see it
  2. impersonal neuter pronoun (clitic form of ello); it, that
    lo esThat’s it

Derived termsEdit

See alsoEdit


SwahiliEdit

PronunciationEdit

InterjectionEdit

lo

  1. oh!

SwedishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle Low German los, from or related to Old Saxon lioht (light).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

lo c

  1. a lynx
    Synonym: lodjur

DeclensionEdit

Declension of lo 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative lo lon loar loarna
Genitive los lons loars loarnas

Derived termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


Tok PisinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From English law.

NounEdit

lo

  1. law

VietnameseEdit

EtymologyEdit

Non-Sino-Vietnamese reading of Chinese (be concerned,worry about, SV: lự).

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

lo (𢗼, 𢥈)

  1. to bother, to worry, to attend to

Derived termsEdit

Derived terms

WelshEdit

NounEdit

lo m

  1. Soft mutation of llo.

MutationEdit

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
llo lo unchanged unchanged
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

NounEdit

lo m

  1. Soft mutation of glo.

MutationEdit

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
glo lo nglo unchanged
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

WestrobothnianEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Norse  f. Cognate with Norwegian lo f, luv m, Old English wlōh f. Related to Old Norse lagðr m (tuft of wool or hair).

NounEdit

lo n

  1. fluff
  2. dust (of tissues)
  3. fringe of cloth and other textiles

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle Low German lōt, from Proto-West Germanic *laud.

NounEdit

lo n

  1. plummet

Etymology 3Edit

From Old Norse lófi, láfi (threshing barn). Cognate with Norwegian låve, Swedish loge.

NounEdit

lo m

  1. threshing barn
Derived termsEdit

XhosaEdit

Etymology 1Edit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

PronunciationEdit

PronounEdit

  1. this; class 1 proximal demonstrative.

Etymology 2Edit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

PronunciationEdit

PronounEdit

  1. this; class 3 proximal demonstrative.

Etymology 3Edit

PronounEdit

-lo

  1. Combining stem of lona.

Zaniza ZapotecEdit

NounEdit

lo

  1. eye

ZhuangEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

ParticleEdit

lo (old orthography lo)

  1. Used at the end of a sentence to indicate a change of state or a new situation.
    • 2016, Gij Baujcingq Moq Caeuq Geij Bonj Gij Baujcingq Daeuzdaeuz [The New Testament with A Few Books of the Old Testament], Hong Kong: New Bridge Publishing Company Limited, →ISBN, Lizsij dih Gaihcij [Genesis] 1:3:
      Gajlaeng Cangqdiq naeuz: “Rongh!” Yiengq couh doq miz rongh lo.
      And God said, Let there be light: and there was light.
  2. Used at the end of a sentence to express affirmation or conclusiveness.

Etymology 2Edit

NounEdit

lo (Sawndip form ⿰女卢, old orthography lo)

  1. (dialectal) daughter-in-law

Etymology 3Edit

VerbEdit

lo (Sawndip form ⿰口卢, old orthography lo)

  1. (dialectal) to worry; to be anxious

ZouEdit

NounEdit

lo

  1. basket

ReferencesEdit


ZuluEdit

Etymology 1Edit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

PronunciationEdit

PronounEdit

lo

  1. this; class 1 proximal demonstrative.
InflectionEdit
Stem -ló
Full form
Locative kulo
Full form
Locative kulo
Copulative yilo
Possessive forms
Modifier Substantive
Class 1 walo owalo
Class 2 balo abalo
Class 3 walo owalo
Class 4 yalo eyalo
Class 5 lalo elalo
Class 6 alo awalo
Class 7 salo esalo
Class 8 zalo ezalo
Class 9 yalo eyalo
Class 10 zalo ezalo
Class 11 lwalo olwalo
Class 14 balo obalo
Class 15 kwalo okwalo
Class 17 kwalo okwalo

Etymology 2Edit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

PronunciationEdit

PronounEdit

lo

  1. this; class 3 proximal demonstrative.
InflectionEdit
Stem -ló
Full form
Locative kulo
Full form
Locative kulo
Copulative yilo
Possessive forms
Modifier Substantive
Class 1 walo owalo
Class 2 balo abalo
Class 3 walo owalo
Class 4 yalo eyalo
Class 5 lalo elalo
Class 6 alo awalo
Class 7 salo esalo
Class 8 zalo ezalo
Class 9 yalo eyalo
Class 10 zalo ezalo
Class 11 lwalo olwalo
Class 14 balo obalo
Class 15 kwalo okwalo
Class 17 kwalo okwalo

Etymology 3Edit

See the etymology of the main entry.

PronunciationEdit

PronounEdit

lo

  1. Combining stem of lona.

ReferencesEdit