English edit

Etymology edit

From Middle English lot, from Old English hlot (portion, choice, decision), from Proto-Germanic *hlutą.

Cognate with North Frisian lod, Saterland Frisian Lot, West Frisian lot, Dutch lot, French lot, German Low German Lott, Middle High German luz. Doublet of lotto. Related also to German Los.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

lot (plural lots)

 
Lot, noun definition 5
  1. A large quantity or number; a great deal.
    Synonyms: load, mass, pile
    to spend a lot of money
    lots of people think so
    • 1877, William Black, Green Pastures and Piccadilly, volume 2, page 4:
      He wrote to her [] he might be detained in London by a lot of business.
    • 1913, Joseph C[rosby] Lincoln, chapter III, in Mr. Pratt’s Patients, New York, N.Y., London: D[aniel] Appleton and Company, →OCLC, page 52:
      I filled my dreener in no time, and then it come to me that 'twouldn't be a bad idee to get a lot more, take 'em with me to Wellmouth, and peddle 'em out.
  2. A separate portion; a number of things taken collectively.
    Synonyms: batch, collection, group, set
    a lot of stationery
  3. One or more items auctioned or sold as a unit, separate from other items.
  4. (informal) A number of people taken collectively.
    Synonyms: crowd, gang, group
    a sorry lot
    a bad lot
    you lot
  5. A distinct portion or plot of land, usually smaller than a field.
    Synonyms: allotment, parcel, plot
    a building lot in a city
    • 1820, James Kent, edited by William Johnson, Reports of cases adjudged in the Court of Chancery of New-York[1], volume 5, published 1822:
      The defendants leased a house and lot, in the City of New-York
  6. That which happens without human design or forethought.
    Synonyms: chance, accident, destiny, fate, fortune
  7. Anything (as a die, pebble, ball, or slip of paper) used in determining a question by chance, or without human choice or will.
    to cast lots
    to draw lots
  8. The part, or fate, that falls to one, as it were, by chance, or without one's planning.
  9. A prize in a lottery.
    Synonym: prize
  10. Allotment; lottery.
    • 1990: Donald Kagan, Pericles of Athens and the Birth of Democracy, chapter 2: “Politician”, page 40 (Guild Publishing; CN 2239)
      Archons served only for one year and, since 487/6, they were chosen by lot. Generals, on the other hand, were chosen by direct election and could be reelected without limit.
  11. (definite, the lot) All members of a set; everything.
    The table was loaded with food, but by evening there was nothing but crumbs; we had eaten the lot.
    If I were in charge, I'd fire the lot of them.
  12. (historical) An old unit of weight used in many European countries from the Middle Ages, often defined as 1/30 or 1/32 of a (local) pound.

Synonyms edit

Derived terms edit

Translations edit

Verb edit

lot (third-person singular simple present lots, present participle lotting, simple past and past participle lotted)

  1. (transitive, dated) To allot; to sort; to apportion.
  2. (US, informal, dated) To count or reckon (on or upon).

Anagrams edit

Albanian edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Albanian *lā(i)ta, and adjective in *-to-, from Proto-Indo-European *lēy- (to pour).[1]

Noun edit

lot m (plural lot, definite loti, definite plural lotët)

  1. tear (from the eye)
    Gjak, djersë dhe lotBlood, sweat and tears

Declension edit

Derived terms edit

References edit

  1. ^ Orel, Vladimir E. (1998), “lot”, in Albanian Etymological Dictionary, Leiden; Boston; Köln: Brill, →ISBN, page 231

Balinese edit

Romanization edit

lot

  1. Romanization of ᬮᭀᬢ᭄

Chinese edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From English lot.

Pronunciation edit


Classifier edit

lot

  1. (Hong Kong Cantonese) Classifier for large quantity of objects or people.
    lotlot [Cantonese]  ―  jat1 lot1 gwo3 [Jyutping]  ―  in a large batch

Dutch edit

Etymology edit

From Middle Dutch and Old Dutch lot, from Frankish *hlot, from Proto-Germanic *hlutą.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

lot n (plural loten, diminutive lootje n)

  1. destiny, fate, lot
    Hij geloofde sterk in het lot en dacht dat alles voorbestemd was.
    He strongly believed in destiny and thought that everything was predetermined.
    Het was haar lot om een ​​belangrijke rol te spelen in het succes van het bedrijf.
    It was her fate to play a significant role in the success of the company.
    Ze accepteerde haar lot en ging verder met haar leven na de tegenslagen.
    She accepted her lot and moved on with her life after the setbacks.
  2. lottery ticket
    Hij kocht een lot voor de grote loterij die dat weekend zou plaatsvinden.
    He bought a lottery ticket for the big lottery that would take place that weekend.
    De winnaar van het grote geldbedrag was de gelukkige houder van het winnende lot.
    The winner of the big cash prize was the lucky holder of the winning lottery ticket.
    Ze kraste de verborgen cijfers op het lot om te zien of ze een prijs had gewonnen.
    She scratched the hidden numbers on the lottery ticket to see if she had won a prize.
  3. (archaic) lot, allotment (that which has been apportioned to a party)

Related terms edit

Descendants edit

  • Negerhollands: loot, lot
  • Caribbean Javanese: lot
  • Indonesian: lot
  • Papiamentu: lòt, lot

Anagrams edit

French edit

Etymology edit

Inherited from Middle French lot, from Old French loz, los, from Frankish *lot, from Proto-Germanic *hlutą. Cognate with English lot.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

lot m (plural lots)

  1. share (of inheritance)
  2. plot (of land)
  3. batch (of goods for sale)
  4. lot (at auction)
  5. prize (in lottery)
  6. lot, fate
  7. (slang) babe

Derived terms edit

Further reading edit

German edit

Pronunciation edit

Verb edit

lot

  1. singular imperative of loten

Indonesian edit

 
Indonesian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia id

Etymology edit

From Dutch lot, from Proto-Germanic *hlutą.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): [ˈlɔt]
  • Hyphenation: lot

Noun edit

lot (first-person possessive lotku, second-person possessive lotmu, third-person possessive lotnya)

  1. lot,
    1. (manufacturing) a separate portion; a number of things taken collectively.
    2. (colloquial) lottery
      Synonyms: lotre, undian
    3. (finance) allotment

Descendants edit

Further reading edit

Irish edit

Noun edit

lot m (genitive singular as substantive loit, genitive as verbal noun loite, nominative plural loit)

  1. verbal noun of loit
  2. injury, impairment
  3. destruction, defacement, mutilation

Declension edit

As a substantive:

As a verbal noun:

Derived terms edit

Verb edit

lot (present analytic lotann, future analytic lotfaidh, verbal noun lot, past participle lota)

  1. Alternative form of loit (wound, destroy, spoil)

Conjugation edit

Lombard edit

Alternative forms edit

  • lòtt (Classical Milanese Orthography)

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

lot m

  1. lotus

Norman edit

Etymology edit

From Frankish *lot, from Proto-Germanic *hlutą.

Noun edit

lot m (plural lots)

  1. (Guernsey) lot (at auction)

Northern Kurdish edit

Noun edit

lot ?

  1. jump

Norwegian Bokmål edit

Verb edit

lot

  1. simple past of la (Etymology 1)
  2. simple past of late

Polish edit

 
Polish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pl

Etymology edit

Inherited from Proto-Slavic *letъ.[1] By surface analysis, deverbal from lecieć.[2][3][4] First attested in 1548–1551.[5]

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

lot m inan

  1. flight (act of flying)
    Synonyms: latanie, fruwanie
  2. flight (nstance of flying)
  3. flight (trip made by an aircraft)
  4. (Middle Polish) flight (fast movement)
  5. (Middle Polish) flight (fast spreading)

Declension edit

Derived terms edit

adjectives
adverbs
nouns
verbs

Related terms edit

adjectives
adverbs
nouns
verbs

Trivia edit

According to Słownik frekwencyjny polszczyzny współczesnej (1990), lot is one of the most used words in Polish, appearing 59 times in scientific texts, 21 times in news, 4 times in essays, 10 times in fiction, and 8 times in plays, each out of a corpus of 100,000 words, totaling 102 times, making it the 618th most common word in a corpus of 500,000 words.[6]

References edit

  1. ^ Bańkowski, Andrzej (2000), “lot”, in Etymologiczny słownik języka polskiego [Etymological Dictionary of the Polish Language] (in Polish)
  2. ^ Boryś, Wiesław (2005), “lecieć”, in Słownik etymologiczny języka polskiego (in Polish), Kraków: Wydawnictwo Literackie, →ISBN
  3. ^ Mańczak, Witold (2017), “lot”, in Polski słownik etymologiczny (in Polish), Kraków: Polska Akademia Umiejętności, →ISBN
  4. ^ Sławski, Franciszek (1958-1965), “lot”, in Jan Safarewicz, Andrzej Siudut, editors, Słownik etymologiczny języka polskiego [Etymological dictionary of the Polish language] (in Polish), Kraków: Towarzystwo Miłośników Języka Polskiego
  5. ^ lot”, in Słownik Polszczyzny XVI Wieku [A Dictionary of 16th Century Polish], 2010-2023
  6. ^ Ida Kurcz (1990), “lot”, in Słownik frekwencyjny polszczyzny współczesnej [Frequency dictionary of the Polish language] (in Polish), volume 1, Kraków; Warszawa: Polska Akademia Nauk. Instytut Języka Polskiego, page 222

Further reading edit

Romanian edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from French lot.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

lot n (plural loturi)

  1. plot (of land)
  2. batch (of goods for sale)
  3. lot (at auction)
  4. national sports team
  5. (dated) lottery ticket

Declension edit

References edit

Scottish Gaelic edit

Etymology edit

From the root of loitiméir (destroyer, botcher).

Noun edit

lot m (gen lota, pl lotan)

  1. sore, wound
  2. sting

Tatar edit

Noun edit

lot

  1. A unit of weight: 1 lot = 3 mısqal = 12.797 g (archaic) (see Tatar units of measurement#Mass)

Declension edit

West Frisian edit

Etymology edit

From Old Frisian hlot, from Proto-Germanic *hlutą.

Noun edit

lot n (plural lotten, diminutive lotsje)

  1. lottery ticket
  2. fate, destiny

Further reading edit

  • lot (I)”, in Wurdboek fan de Fryske taal (in Dutch), 2011