Open main menu

Wiktionary β

See also: Mank

Contents

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English manken, from Old English mancian, bemancian (to maim, mutilate), of obscure origin. Cognate with Dutch and Middle Low German mank (lame, defective), Middle High German manc (lack, defect). Perhaps from Latin mancus (maimed, crippled, frail, incomplete), from Proto-Indo-European *mank-, *menk- (maimed, mutilation, torment).

VerbEdit

mank (third-person singular simple present manks, present participle manking, simple past and past participle manked)

  1. (transitive, obsolete) To mutilate.
Related termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Via Polari, from Italian mancare (to be lacking), from Latin mancus (maimed). See above.

AdjectiveEdit

mank (not comparable)

  1. (Britain, slang, originally Polari) Disgusting, repulsive.
    Synonyms: manky (slang), ming (slang), minging (slang)
    When he eats, he never closes his mouth. It's so mank.

NounEdit

mank (uncountable)

  1. (Britain, slang, originally Polari) Something that is disgusting or manky.
    The plumber had to get all the mank out of the drain.

DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle Dutch manc (a limping or lame person), from Latin mancus (maimed or defective), from Proto-Indo-European *man-ko- (maimed in the hand), from *man-

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

mank (comparative manker, superlative mankst)

  1. lame

InflectionEdit

Inflection of mank
uninflected mank
inflected manke
comparative manker
positive comparative superlative
predicative/adverbial mank manker het mankst
het mankste
indefinite m./f. sing. manke mankere mankste
n. sing. mank manker mankste
plural manke mankere mankste
definite manke mankere mankste
partitive manks mankers

Related termsEdit