See also: Ming, míng, mǐng, mìng, and Míng

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK, US) IPA(key): /mɪŋ/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɪŋ

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English mingen, mengen, from Old English mengan (to mix, combine, unite, associate with, consort, cohabit with, disturb, converse), from Proto-West Germanic *mangijan (to mix, knead), from Proto-Indo-European *menk- (to rumple, knead). Cognate with Dutch mengen (to mix, blend, mingle), German mengen (to mix), Danish mænge (to rub), Old English ġemang (mixture, union, troop, crowd, multitude, congregation, assembly, business, cohabitation). More at among.

Alternative formsEdit

VerbEdit

ming (third-person singular simple present mings, present participle minging, simple past and past participle minged or meint or ment or meynt)

  1. (now rare) To mix, blend, mingle.
    Synonyms: bemingle, combine, mang, meddle; see also Thesaurus:mix
    • 1562, William Turner, Baths:
      I founde here and there litle peces of marquesites and stones, menged with copper, but I could by no sense or wit perceyue, that the bathes had any notable qualitie thereof.
  2. (obsolete) To bring (people, animals etc.) together; to be joined, in marriage or sexual intercourse.
  3. (UK, dialectal) To produce through mixing; especially, to knead.

NounEdit

ming (plural mings)

  1. (Britain) A mixture.
  2. (Britain, Lincolnshire, obsolete, land) The state of being under mixed ownership; land under mixed ownership, particularly without physical demarcations designating ownership.
    • 17 September 1811, [Description of] Counterpart of Demise from John Thorold to John Wilson of Grantham, Lincolnshire Archives, Ref. Thor 1/2/ZA25/4 Published by The National Archives, Accessed 19 June 2022.
      Property: 1. 6 acres of land in ming with a meadow of Glebe land of the rectory of Grayingham.

Etymology 2Edit

Backformation from minging.

VerbEdit

ming (third-person singular simple present mings, present participle minging, simple past and past participle minged)

  1. (Britain, slang) To be unattractive (person or object).
  2. (Britain, slang) To be foul-smelling.
Related termsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

From Middle English mingen, mengen, mungen, muneȝen, from Old English myngian, mynegian, ġemynegian (to bring to mind, have in mind), from myne (mind), from ġemunan (to remember), from Proto-Germanic *munaną (to think), from Proto-Indo-European *men- (to think). Merged in Middle English with Old English ġemyndgian (to remember, be mindful, remind, intend, commemorate, mention, exhort, impel, warn, demand payment). More at mind.

Alternative formsEdit

VerbEdit

ming (third-person singular simple present mings, present participle minging, simple past and past participle minged)

  1. (transitive, obsolete) To speak of, to mention.

Etymology 4Edit

From Chinese (mìng, destiny, fate; luck).

NounEdit

ming (uncountable)

  1. (Confucianism) Destiny, fate.

MandarinEdit

RomanizationEdit

ming

  1. Nonstandard spelling of míng.
  2. Nonstandard spelling of mǐng.
  3. Nonstandard spelling of mìng.

Usage notesEdit

  • English transcriptions of Mandarin speech often fail to distinguish between the critical tonal differences employed in the Mandarin language, using words such as this one without the appropriate indication of tone.

ScotsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English mengen (to mix), mynge et al., from Old English mengan (to mix). In sense "to stink" probably derived from the specialized sheep-smearing sense.

NounEdit

ming (plural mings)

  1. (obsolete) The ingredients mixed with or substituted for tar in sheep-smearing.
  2. (obsolete) Human feces, excrement.
  3. A bad smell.

VerbEdit

ming (third-person singular simple present mings, present participle mingin, simple past mingt, past participle mingt)

  1. (obsolete) To mix, mingle, ming; to confuse.
  2. (obsolete) To mix tar for sheep-smearing.
  3. (usually in present participle) To be malodorous, to stink.
  4. (generally) Disgusting; bad.

UzbekEdit

Uzbek cardinal numbers
 <  999 1000 1001  > 
    Cardinal : ming
    Ordinal : minginchi

PronunciationEdit

NumeralEdit

ming

  1. thousand