See also: marqué

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from French marque. Doublet of mark.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

marque (plural marques)

  1. A license to pass the limits of a jurisdiction, or boundary of a country, for the purpose of making reprisals; a letter of marque.
  2. A brand or make of a manufactured product, especially of a motor car (in contradistinction to a model).
    • 2001 January 31, Nicholas Bannister, “BMW's unofficial input into new MGs”, in The Guardian[1]:
      The group wants Rover as its luxury marque and MG as the performance car.
    • 2020 December 3, Brett Berk, “The S.U.V.-ification of Everything Comes to Classic British Marques”, in The New York Times[2], ISSN 0362-4331:
      And there seems to be an intrinsic disconnect between a high-end marque and the utilitarian nature of an S.U.V.
  3. A ship commissioned for making captures.

TranslationsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Frankish *mark, from Proto-Germanic *marką. Or from marquer, from Frankish *markōn, from the noun.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

marque f (plural marques)

  1. mark (spot)
  2. brand (of a company)
  3. mark (on one's body, e.g. a birthmark)

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • English: marque
  • German: Marke

See alsoEdit

VerbEdit

marque

  1. inflection of marquer:
    1. first/third-person singular present indicative/subjunctive
    2. second-person singular imperative

Further readingEdit


PortugueseEdit

VerbEdit

marque

  1. first-person singular (eu) present subjunctive of marcar
  2. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) present subjunctive of marcar
  3. third-person singular (você) affirmative imperative of marcar
  4. third-person singular (você) negative imperative of marcar

SpanishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈmaɾke/, [ˈmaɾ.ke]

VerbEdit

marque

  1. inflection of marcar:
    1. first-person singular present subjunctive
    2. third-person singular present subjunctive
    3. third-person singular imperative