See also: Brand, bränd, and brænd

EnglishEdit

 
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EtymologyEdit

From Middle English brand, from Old English brand (fire; flame; burning; torch; sword), from Proto-Germanic *brandaz (flame; flaming; fire-brand; torch; sword), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰrenu- (to bubble forth; brew; spew forth; burn). Cognate with Scots brand, West Frisian brân (fire), Dutch brand, German Brand, Swedish brand (blaze, fire), Icelandic brandur, French brand (< Germanic). Parallel to e.g. Proto-Slavic *gorěti (to burn) from Proto-Indo-European *bʰrenu- (to bubble forth; brew; spew forth; burn).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /bɹænd/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ænd

NounEdit

brand (plural brands)

  1. (obsolete, rare) A conflagration; a flame.
    • 1559, Jasper Heywood (translator), Troas
      Goe to prepare the maryages what neede the torchis light? be holde the towres of troy do shyne with brandes that blase full bright.
    • 1559, Jasper Heywood (translator), Troas
      Is yet againe thy brest enflamde,
      with brande of venus might
  2. (archaic or poetic) A piece of burning wood or peat, or a glowing cinder.
    To burn something to brands and ashes.
    • 1513, Gavin Douglas, The Eneados
      The fearful brands and bleezes of het fire.
    • 1859-1890, John Gorham Palfrey, History of New England to the Revolutionary War
      Snatching a live brand from a wigwam, Mason threw it on a matted roof.
    • 1835, [Washington Irving], chapter VI, in A Tour on the Prairies (The Crayon Miscellany; no. 1), Philadelphia, Pa.: [Henry Charles] Carey, [Isaac] Lea, & Blanchard, OCLC 557798950, page 47:
      About three o'clock, we came to a recent camping place of the company of rangers: the brands of one of their fires were still smoking; so that, according to the opinion of Beatte, they could not have passed on above a day previously.
    • 1559, Jasper Heywood (translator), Troas
      Or when amid the Grecians shippes,
      he threw the brandes of fyre.
  3. (Scotland, Northern England) A torch used for signaling.
  4. (archaic) A sword.
  5. A mark or scar made by burning with a hot iron, especially to mark cattle or to classify the contents of a cask.
  6. A branding iron.
  7. The symbolic identity, represented by a name and/or a logo, which indicates a certain product or service to the public.
    • 1999, Bernd Schmitt, Experiential marketing, page 39:
      The Amtrak brand revitalization approach represents one of the most ambitious, comprehensive, and systematic experiential marketing approaches I have ever seen.
    • 2000, Duane E. Knapp, The Brandmindset, page 67:
      In this way, every Citibanker becomes a brand manager and an ambassador of the Citibank brand. ... Indeed, the Citibank brand will "never sleep"
    • 2010, Gayle Soucek, Marshall Field's: The Store That Helped Build Chicago, page 136:
      Mr. Lundgren claimed that Federated had conducted a focus group and the analysis showed that most people were either indifferent to the name change or preferred the Macy's brand.
    • 2013 July 20, “The attack of the MOOCs”, in The Economist[1], volume 408, number 8845:
      Since the launch early last year of [] two Silicon Valley start-ups offering free education through MOOCs, massive open online courses, the ivory towers of academia have been shaken to their foundations. University brands built in some cases over centuries have been forced to contemplate the possibility that information technology will rapidly make their existing business model obsolete.
  8. A specific product, service, or provider so distinguished.
    Some brands of breakfast cereal contain a lot of sugar.
  9. (by extension) Any specific type or variety of something; a distinct style or manner.
    I didn't appreciate his particular brand of flattery.
    New Orleans brand sausage; Danish brand ham
    • 2014 November 17, Roger Cohen, “The horror! The horror! The trauma of ISIS [print version: International New York Times, 18 November 2014, p. 9]”, in The New York Times[2]:
      [O]ne minute this "Jihadi John" was struggling to get by, and get accepted, in drizzly England, unemployed with a mortgage to pay and a chip on his shoulder, and the next he stands in brilliant Levantine sunlight, where everything is clear and etched, at the vanguard of some Sunni Risorgimento intent on subjecting the world to its murderous brand of Wahhabi Islam.
  10. The public image or reputation and recognized, typical style of an individual or group.
    • 2011, Tom Bevan, Carl M. Cannon, Election 2012: The Battle Begins, Crown (→ISBN)
      The Obama brand had taken a hit two months earlier, when he campaigned for Creigh Deeds in Virginia and Jon Corzine in New Jersey, only to see them both lose.
    • 2012, Start Your Own Personal Concierge Service, Entrepreneur Press (→ISBN), page 104:
      Her brand is edgy, cosmopolitan, and out-of-the-box, so blogging is the perfect, ever-changing match for her.
    • 2019, Sally Thorne, 99 Percent Mine: A Novel, HarperCollins (→ISBN):
      He unplugged my umbilical cord to take a leisurely swig, smirking, watching me turn blue before giving it back. My cardiologist told me that was impossible, but I'm still convinced. That's very on-brand for [my twin] Jamie.
  11. A mark of infamy; stigma.
  12. Any minute fungus producing a burnt appearance in plants.

SynonymsEdit

HyponymsEdit

  • (mark made by burning a human): badge

Derived termsEdit

brand (noun)

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

VerbEdit

brand (third-person singular simple present brands, present participle branding, simple past and past participle branded)

  1. (transitive) To burn the flesh with a hot iron, either as a marker (for criminals, slaves etc.) or to cauterise a wound.
    When they caught him, he was branded and then locked up.
  2. (transitive) To mark (especially cattle) with a brand as proof of ownership.
    The ranch hands had to brand every new calf by lunchtime.
  3. (transitive) To make an indelible impression on the memory or senses.
    Her face is branded upon my memory.
  4. (transitive) To stigmatize, label (someone).
    He was branded a fool by everyone that heard his story.
    • 1908, W[illiam] B[lair] M[orton] Ferguson, chapter II, in Zollenstein, New York, N.Y.: D. Appleton & Company, OCLC 731476803:
      I had never defrauded a man of a farthing, nor called him knave behind his back. But now the last rag that covered my nakedness had been torn from me. I was branded a blackleg, card-sharper, and murderer.
    • 2011 October 23, Phil McNulty, “Man Utd 1-6 Man City”, in BBC Sport:
      As Ferguson strode briskly towards the Stretford End at the final whistle, he will have been reflecting on the extent of the challenge now facing him from the club he once branded "noisy neighbours".
  5. (transitive, marketing) To associate a product or service with a trademark or other name and related images.
    They branded the new detergent "Suds-O", with a nature scene inside a green O on the muted-colored recycled-cardboard box.

TranslationsEdit

Derived termsEdit

brand (verb)

Related termsEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • brand at OneLook Dictionary Search
  • brand in Keywords for Today: A 21st Century Vocabulary, edited by The Keywords Project, Colin MacCabe, Holly Yanacek, 2018.
  • brand in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

AfrikaansEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Dutch brand, from Middle Dutch brant, from Old Dutch *brand, from Proto-Germanic *brandaz.

NounEdit

brand (plural brande, diminutive brandjie)

  1. destructive, catastrophic fire (such as a house fire)
    Daar was 'n vreeslike brand in die wildtuin.
    There was a horrible fire in the nature reserve.

Etymology 2Edit

From Dutch branden, from Middle Dutch branden.

VerbEdit

brand (present brand, present participle brandende, past participle gebrand)

  1. (ergative) to burn
    Die kerse brand so pragtig, dis sprokiesagtig!
    The candles burn so gorgeously, it's picturesque!
    Die kleuter het 'n gat in my tafelkleed gebrand.
    That toddler has burnt a hole in my tablecloth.

DanishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Danish brand, from Old Norse brandr, from Proto-Germanic *brandaz, compare with Swedish brand, English brand, German Brand.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

brand c (singular definite branden, plural indefinite brande)

  1. fire (large, destructive fire, as in a building)
  2. smut (plant disease)
InflectionEdit
ReferencesEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Borrowed from English brand, cognate with the former word.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /braːnd/, [ˈb̥ɹæːnd̥]

NounEdit

brand n (singular definite brandet, plural indefinite brands)

  1. brand (public image)
  2. brand (a specific product)
InflectionEdit
ReferencesEdit

Etymology 3Edit

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /braːnd/, [ˈb̥ɹæːnd̥]

VerbEdit

brand

  1. imperative of brande

DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle Dutch brant, from Old Dutch *brand, from Proto-Germanic *brandaz.

NounEdit

brand m (plural branden, diminutive brandje n)

  1. destructive, catastrophic fire (such as a house fire)
    Die vreselijke brand was veroorzaakt doordat een kleuter met kaarsen speelde.
    That terrible fire originated because a toddler was playing with candles.
Derived termsEdit
DescendantsEdit
  • Afrikaans: brand
  • Negerhollands: bran
    • Virgin Islands Creole: bran
See alsoEdit

Etymology 2Edit

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

VerbEdit

brand

  1. first-person singular present indicative of branden
  2. imperative of branden

FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle French brand, from Old French brant, from Frankish *brand (firebrand, flaming sword), from Proto-Germanic *brandaz (firebrand, torch, sword), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰrenu- (to burn). Cognate with Old High German brant (fire, firebrand, burning iron), Old English brand (fire, flame, brand, torch, sword, weapon), Old Norse brandr (fire, firebrand, sword). More at English brand.

NounEdit

brand m (plural brands)

  1. (archaic) a sword

Further readingEdit


IcelandicEdit

NounEdit

brand

  1. indefinite accusative singular of brandur

ItalianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English brand.

NounEdit

brand m (invariable)

  1. brand (product symbol)

Middle EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old English brand, brond, from Proto-West Germanic *brand, from Proto-Germanic *brandaz.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

brand (plural brandes)

  1. fire, flame
  2. burning wood or coal
  3. torch (lit stick)
    • c. 1395, John Wycliffe, John Purvey [et al.], transl., Bible (Wycliffite Bible (later version), MS Lich 10.)‎[3], published c. 1410, Apocalips 8:10-11, page 120r, column 1; republished as Wycliffe's translation of the New Testament, Lichfield: Bill Endres, 2010:
      And þe þꝛidde aungel trumpide .· ⁊ a greet ſterre bꝛennynge as a litil bꝛond felde fro heuene ⁊ it felde in to þe þꝛidde part of floodis .· ⁊ in to þe wellis of watris ⁊ þe name of þe ſterre is ſeid wermod ⁊ þe þꝛidde part of watris .· was maad in to wermod ⁊ manye men weren deed of þe watris .· for þo weren maad bittir
      And the third angel blew his trumpet, then a great star burning like a little torch fell from heaven; it fell upon a third of [the world's] rivers and water sources. The name of the star is Wormwood, and a third of the [world's] water was turned into wormwood; many people died from that water because it'd been made bitter.
  4. sword, blade

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse brandr. Doublet of brann.

NounEdit

brand m (definite singular branden, indefinite plural brandar, definite plural brandane)

  1. This term needs a translation to English. Please help out and add a translation, then remove the text {{rfdef}}.
  2. form removed with the spelling reform of 1938; superseded by brann; fire

ReferencesEdit


OccitanEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

brand m (plural brands)

  1. (nautical) pitch (movement around the beam axis)

Old DanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse brandr.

NounEdit

brand

  1. fire (occurrence of fire in a certain place)

DescendantsEdit


Old EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-West Germanic *brand, from Proto-Germanic *brandaz.

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

brand m

  1. firebrand; torch
  2. a sword (poetic)

DeclensionEdit

DescendantsEdit


Old NorseEdit

NounEdit

brand

  1. indefinite accusative singular of brandr

SwedishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Swedish brander, from Old Norse brandr, from Proto-Germanic *brandaz, from Proto-Indo-European *bʰrenu-. A derivative of brinna.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

brand c

  1. accidental, uncontrollable fire, conflagration
  2. (archaic, poetic) sword

DeclensionEdit

Declension of brand 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative brand branden bränder bränderna
Genitive brands brandens bränders brändernas

Derived termsEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit