See also: mark, Márk, and märk

EnglishEdit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

PronunciationEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English Mark, from the Latin praenomen (i.e. forename) Marcus, derived from Mars, the Roman god of war, originally Mavors, from *Māwort-.

Proper nounEdit

Mark

  Mark on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  Mark on Wikisource.Wikisource
Wiktionary has an Appendix listing books of the Bible

  1. A male given name from Latin.
    • 1988, Ann Oakley, Men's Room, page 25-26:
      "And your name?" she said, "I suppose it's quite unremarkable?" "Very funny." "Mark. It could stand as a symbol of a man, for men as a category," she reflected, "but I don't suppose that's why your mother gave it to you?" "My mother's motives always were impenetrable to me. I was her only child, she wanted a simple life. So she gave me a simple name to go along with it. --- It wasn't a popular name until the nineteenth century. People were put off by King Mark in the Tristram and Iseult."
  2. Mark the Evangelist, also called John Mark, the first patriarch of Alexandria, credited with the authorship of the Gospel of Mark.
    • , Acts 15: 37-39:
      And Barnabas was determined to take with them John, whose surname was Mark. But Paul thought it not good to take him with them, who departed from them in Pamphylia, and went not with them to the work. And the contention was so sharp between them, that they departed asunder from the other; and so Barnabas took Mark, and sailed to Cyprus.
  3. (biblical) The Gospel of St. Mark, a book of the New Testament of the Bible. Traditionally the second of the four gospels.
    Synonym: Mar. (abbreviation)
  4. A surname​.

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

NounEdit

Mark

  1. (astronomy) Abbreviation of Markarian.

Alternative formsEdit

SynonymsEdit

(Markarian):

AnagramsEdit


AlbanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin Marcus.

Proper nounEdit

  • Mark (m Marku)
  • Mark (m Marki) (alternative Gheg definite form)
  1. A male given name, equivalent to English Marc

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit


AzerbaijaniEdit

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Proper nounEdit

Mark

  1. A male given name, equivalent to English Mark

DanishEdit

Proper nounEdit

Mark

  1. A male given name borrowed from English, or short for Markvard.

DutchEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin Marcus.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /mɑrk/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: Mark
  • Rhymes: -ɑrk

Proper nounEdit

Mark m

  1. A male given name, equivalent to English Mark.

AnagramsEdit


EstonianEdit

Proper nounEdit

Mark

  1. A male given name, a short form of Markus.
  2. A surname​.

GermanEdit

Zwanzig Mark Gold, 1873

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle High German marc, marke.

NounEdit

Mark f (genitive Mark, plural Mark)

  1. the name of a currency, mark
DeclensionEdit
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

 
Eine Grenzmark

From Old High German marka, from Proto-Germanic *markō, cognate with English margin.

NounEdit

Mark f (genitive Mark, plural Marken)

  1. a usually fortified area along the border; marches
    Synonym: Grenzmark
DeclensionEdit
Derived termsEdit

Proper nounEdit

Mark m (genitive Marks)

  1. A male given name, short form of compound names beginning with the Germanic element mark "area along the border", such as Markolf and Markward.

Etymology 3Edit

Querschnitt eines Knochens mit Mark
Tomatenmark

From Middle High German marc, from Old High German marg, from Proto-Germanic *mazgą, from Proto-Indo-European *mozgos, *mosgʰos. Compare Dutch merg, English marrow, Swedish märg, Norwegian Bokmål marg, Icelandic mergur.

NounEdit

Mark n (genitive Marks or Markes, no plural)

  1. marrow
  2. pith, the solid mass in the inner of a fruit
DeclensionEdit
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 4Edit

From Latin Marcus.

Proper nounEdit

Mark m (genitive Marks)

  1. A male given name from Latin, variant of Markus, equivalent to English Mark

Related termsEdit

Etymology 5Edit

NounEdit

Mark m (genitive Marks or Markes, no plural)

  1. Alternative form of Merk (water parsnip)
    • 1857, Schmidlin, Eduard, Populäre Botanik oder gemeinfassliche Anleitung zum Studium der Pflanze und des Pflanzenreiches. Zugleich ein Handbuch zum Bestimmen der Pflanzen auf Excursionen, Stuttgart: Krais & Hoffmann, page 638:
      […] Fig. 629 den breitblätterigen Mark (Sium latifolium), eine häufige aber etwas verdächtige Dolde in Gräben und an feuchten Orten; […]
      […] Fig. 629 the broad-leaved water parsnip (Sium latifolium), a frequent but somewhat suspicious umbel in ditches and moist places; […]
DeclensionEdit