BasqueEdit

EtymologyEdit

Inherited from Proto-Basque, from Latin mārtius (of Mars).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

marti inan

  1. March

DeclensionEdit

Declension of marti (inanimate, ending in vowel)
indefinite singular plural
absolutive marti martia martiak
ergative martik martiak martiek
dative martiri martiari martiei
genitive martiren martiaren martien
comitative martirekin martiarekin martiekin
causative martirengatik martiarengatik martiengatik
benefactive martirentzat martiarentzat martientzat
instrumental martiz martiaz martiez
insessive martitan martian martietan
locative martitako martiko martietako
allative martitara martira martietara
terminative martitaraino martiraino martietaraino
directive martitarantz martirantz martietarantz
destinative martitarako martirako martietarako
ablative martitatik martitik martietatik
partitive martirik
prolative martitzat

SynonymsEdit


CorsicanEdit

 
Corsican Wikipedia has an article on:
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Days of the week
Previous: luni
Next: mercuri

EtymologyEdit

From Latin Mārtis diēs. Cognates include Italian martedì and French mardi.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈmarti/
    • (Cismontane) IPA(key): [ˈmærti]
    • (Ultramontane) IPA(key): [ˈmarti]
  • Hyphenation: mar‧ti
  • Rhymes: -arti

NounEdit

marti m (uncountable)

  1. Tuesday

ReferencesEdit

  • marti” in INFCOR: Banca di dati di a lingua corsa
  • Jacques Fusina (1999) Parlons Corse, Editions L'Harmattan, →ISBN, page 51

IdoEdit

NounEdit

marti

  1. plural of marto

LatinEdit

NounEdit

martī

  1. dative singular of martēs

LatvianEdit

NounEdit

marti m

  1. nominative plural form of marts
  2. vocative plural form of marts

LithuanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Indo-European *meryo (young man, woman), see also Ancient Greek μεῖραξ (meîrax, knave, boy, girl), Latin marītus (married (of men)), Old Prussian mergo (girl, bondmaid), Cornish myrgh (daughter, woman).[1]

Also related to Lithuanian merga (girl) and its various suffixed forms, Latvian mērga (bride; maiden).

NounEdit

martì f (plural mar̃čios) stress pattern 4 (diminutive martẽlė)

  1. daughter-in-law[2]

DeclensionEdit

SynonymsEdit

AntonymsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Pokorny, Julius (1959) Indogermanisches etymologisches Wörterbuch [Indo-European Etymological Dictionary] (in German), Bern, München: Francke Verlag, page 2078
  2. ^ Martsinkyavitshute, Victoria (1993), Hippocrene Concise Dictionary: Lithuanian-English/English-Lithuanian. New York: Hippocrene Books. →ISBN

SicilianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Gallo-Italic (such as older Lombard or Piedmontese martes), or clipping of martidìa, inherited from Latin Mārtis diēs (day of Mars).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈmaɾ.ti/, [ˈmäɾt̪ɪ]
  • Hyphenation: màr‧ti

NounEdit

marti m (plural marti)

  1. Tuesday
    Synonym: martidìa

See alsoEdit


VenetianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Inherited from Latin diēs Mārtis (day of Mars). Compare Italian martedì.

NounEdit

marti m (plural marti)

  1. Tuesday