Cornish edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Brythonic *daɣ, from Proto-Celtic *dagos (good) (compare Irish dea-).

Adjective edit

  1. good

Friulian edit

Etymology edit

From Latin dare, present active infinitive of (give).

Verb edit

  1. (transitive) to give

Conjugation edit

This is an irregular verb with some regular paradigms.

Related terms edit

Ligurian edit

Etymology edit

From Latin dare, present active infinitive of do (I give).

Pronunciation edit

Verb edit

  1. (transitive) to give

Conjugation edit

Macanese edit

Etymology edit

From Portuguese dar.

Verb edit

  1. to give
    carato give consideration to (literally, “to give face”)
    cavacoto take offence
    comêto feed, to give feed
    comê genteto supply food, accept orders for food
    co faltato notice the lack
    co queixoto expire
    côr di sito give the news
    côtito have a cramp
    fundoto stop (literally, “to give the bottom”)
    vestíto help dress (literally, “to give dressing”)
    lembrançato send regards to (literally, “to give memories”)
    mordecimto annoy
    Dios graçaGod be with you (literally, “God give you thanks”)
    Diabo capa, diabo campenha
    The criminal will always leave a clue that will incriminate him
    (literally, “If the devil gives you a cloak, he will also give you a bell”)

Usage notes edit

  • Some extended usages of the verb are likely calques from Cantonese. For example, dâ cara is a calque of Cantonese 畀面 (bei2 min6-2), and probably not related to Spanish dar la cara (to face up to, to face the consequences).

References edit

Sicilian edit

Preposition edit

  1. Contraction of di la (of the).

Welsh edit

Adjective edit

  1. Obsolete spelling of da (good)

Mutation edit

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
ddâ unchanged
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.