See also: masc., MASc, M.A.Sc., M. A. Sc., masć, and maść

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Clipping of masculine.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

masc (comparative more masc, superlative most masc)

  1. (colloquial) Masculine (having qualities stereotypically associated with men; virile).
    Synonym: butch
    Antonym: fem

NounEdit

masc (plural mascs)

  1. (LGBT) A person whose gender (identity) is masculine (but who is not necessarily a man).
    • 2018, Quinn Eades, Son Vivienne, Going Postal: More than 'Yes' or 'No': One year on: writings from the marriage equality postal survey, Brow Books (→ISBN):
      Then there's trans men and non-binary mascs, who can change their birth certificates to MALE after breast removal surgery. []
    • 2019, Morgan Lev Edward Holleb, The A-Z of Gender and Sexuality: From Ace to Ze, Jessica Kingsley Publishers (→ISBN), page 140:
      In other words, it's a queer space for all men, and women who are trans. Anyone who is read as a cis woman (e.g., lots of trans men and trans mascs) is not welcomed. Grindr has popularized the terms “discreet,” “straight-passing,” and “convincing” within gay culture.

Coordinate termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


Old EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Proto-Germanic *maską, from Proto-Indo-European *mezg- (to knit, twist, plait). Akin to Old High German māsca (mesh), Old Saxon maska (net), Old Norse mǫskvi, mǫskun (mesh), Old English mæscre (mesh).

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

masċ n

  1. net
DeclensionEdit
DescendantsEdit
  • English: mesh

Etymology 2Edit

From Proto-Germanic *maiską (mixture, mash), from Proto-Indo-European *meik- (to mix). Akin to Middle Low German masch, mēsch, meisch (unfermented malt sap, mash), Middle High German meisch (mash) (German Maisch (crushed grapes)), Swedish mäsk (mash, feed for animals), Old English miscian, mixian (to mix). More at mix.

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

māsċ n

  1. mash
DeclensionEdit
Usage notesEdit
  • Attested only in compounds.
DescendantsEdit