Last modified on 18 April 2015, at 16:18

net

See also: Net, .net, and nét

EnglishEdit

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Wikipedia

A fishing net
A net of a dodecahedron

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old English net, from Proto-Germanic *natją, from Proto-Indo-European *ned- (to turn, twist, knot). Compare West Frisian net, Low German Nett, Dutch net, German Netz, Danish net, Swedish nät.

NounEdit

net (plural nets)

  1. A mesh of string, cord or rope.
    a net for the hair; a mosquito net; a tennis net
  2. A device made from such mesh, used for catching fish, butterflies, etc.
    • 1913, Joseph C. Lincoln, chapter 1, Mr. Pratt's Patients:
      Then there came a reg'lar terror of a sou'wester same as you don't get one summer in a thousand, and blowed the shanty flat and ripped about half of the weir poles out of the sand. We spent consider'ble money getting 'em reset, and then a swordfish got into the pound and tore the nets all to slathers, right in the middle of the squiteague season.
  3. A device made from such mesh, generally used for trapping something.
  4. Anything that has the appearance of such a device.
    Petri net
  5. (by extension) A trap.
    • Bible, Proverbs xxix. 5
      A man that flattereth his neighbor spreadeth a net for his feet.
    caught in the prosecuting attorney's net
  6. (geometry) Of a polyhedron, any set of polygons joined edge to edge that, when folded along the edges between adjoining polygons so that the outer edges touch, form the polyhedron.
  7. A system that interconnects a number of users, locations etc. allowing transport or communication between them, e.g. computer ~, road ~, electricity distribution ~.
  8. (sports) A framework backed by a mesh, serving as the goal in hockey, soccer, lacrosse, etc.
    • 2010 December 29, Mark Vesty, “Wigan 2-2 Arsenal”, BBC:
      Wigan had N'Zogbia sent off late on but Squillaci headed into his own net to give the home side a deserved point.
    The striker headed the ball into the net to make it 1-0.
  9. (sports, tennis) A mesh stretched to divide the court in tennis, badminton, volleyball, etc.
SynonymsEdit
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

VerbEdit

net (third-person singular simple present nets, present participle netting, simple past and past participle netted)

  1. (transitive) To catch by means of a net.
  2. (transitive, figuratively) To catch in a trap, or by stratagem.
    • Sir Walter Scott
      And now I am here, netted and in the toils.
  3. To enclose or cover with a net.
    to net a tree
  4. (transitive, soccer) To score (a goal).
    Evans netted the winner in the 80th minute.
    • 2012, Chelsea 6-0 Wolves [1]
      Romeu then scored a penalty, Torres netted a header and Moses added the sixth from substitute Oscar's cross.
  5. (tennis) To hit the ball into the net.
  6. To form network or netting; to knit.
SynonymsEdit
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English net, nette, from Old French net, from Latin nitidus. Compare nitid, neat.

Alternative formsEdit

AdjectiveEdit

net (not comparable)

  1. (obsolete) Good, desirable; clean, decent, clear.
    • 1590, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, III.xii:
      Her brest all naked, as net iuory, / Without adorne of gold or siluer bright []
  2. Free from extraneous substances; pure; unadulterated; neat.
    net wine
  3. Remaining after expenses or deductions.
    net profit; net weight
  4. Final; end.
    net result; net conclusion
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

AdverbEdit

net (not comparable)

  1. after expenses or deductions
    You'll have $5000 net.

NounEdit

net (plural nets)

  1. The amount remaining after expenses are deducted; profit.
TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

net (third-person singular simple present nets, present participle netting, simple past and past participle netted)

  1. (transitive) To receive as profit.
    The company nets $30 on every sale.
  2. (transitive) To yield as profit for.
    The scam netted the criminals $30,000.
  3. To fully hedge a position.
    Every party is netting their position with a counter-party
TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin nitidus.

AdjectiveEdit

net m (feminine neta, masculine plural nets, feminine plural netes)

  1. clean
  2. net

AdverbEdit

net

  1. cleanly

DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle Dutch net, nette, from Old Dutch *net, *netti, from Proto-Germanic *natją, from Proto-Indo-European *ned- (to turn, twist, knot). Compare West Frisian net, Low German Nett, English net, German Netz, Danish net, Swedish nät.

NounEdit

net n (plural netten, diminutive netje n)

  1. net (mesh)
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle Dutch net, which is borrowed from French net, from Latin nitidus.[1]

AdjectiveEdit

net (comparative netter, superlative netst)

  1. clean, tidy
  2. decent, proper
DeclensionEdit
Derived termsEdit

AdverbEdit

net

  1. tidily, neatly
  2. decently, properly
  3. just, nearly, barely
  4. just recently
Derived termsEdit

AnagramsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ net; in: J. de Vries & F. de Tollenaere, "Etymologisch Woordenboek", Uitgeverij Het Spectrum, Utrecht, 1986 (14de druk)

FaroeseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse net, from Proto-Germanic *natją, from Proto-Indo-European *ned- (to turn, twist, knot).

NounEdit

net n (genitive singular nets, plural net)

  1. (fowling, sports) mesh, the material to make a "nót" (fishing net)
  2. A network (computing)
  3. A net for carrying hay

DeclensionEdit

n3 Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative net netið net netini
Accusative net netið net netini
Dative neti netinum netum netunum
Genitive nets netsins neta netanna

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin nitidus (shiny).

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

net m (feminine nette, masculine plural nets, feminine plural nettes)

  1. clean, tidy
  2. clear
  3. neat
  4. net (clarification of this French definition is being sought)

Derived termsEdit

External linksEdit


FriulianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin nitidus.

AdjectiveEdit

net

  1. clean, neat

Derived termsEdit


GalloEdit

EtymologyEdit

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page as described here.

AdverbEdit

net

  1. completely, entirely

GermanEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdverbEdit

net

  1. (colloquial, regional, Austria, southern Germany, parts of central Germany) alternative form of nicht (not)
    Hab ich’s dir net erzählt?
    Have I not told you?

IcelandicEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse net, from Proto-Germanic *natją, from Proto-Indo-European *ned- (to turn, twist, knot).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

net n

  1. net
  2. (computing) network
  3. (computing, usually definite) the Internet

DeclensionEdit

SynonymsEdit


KvenEdit

PronounEdit

net

  1. (personal) they

SynonymsEdit


LatinEdit

VerbEdit

net

  1. third-person singular present active subjunctive of

LuxembourgishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old High German niowiht, from nio (never) + wiht (thing, being), from Proto-Germanic *ne (not) + *aiw- (ever) + *wiht- (thing). Compare English not, German nicht, Dutch niet, West Frisian net.

PronunciationEdit

AdverbEdit

net

  1. not

NormanEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin nitidus (shiny).

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

net m (f nette, m plural nets, f plural nettes)

  1. (Jersey) clean

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit


Old EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *natją, whence also Old Frisian nette, nitte, Old Saxon net, nett, netti, Old High German nezzi, Old Norse net, Gothic 𐌽𐌰𐍄𐌹 (nati). Ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *ned- (to turn, twist, knot). Perhaps related to Albanian neth (sprout, bud) and Russian нить (nitʹ, thread).

NounEdit

net n

  1. net

DescendantsEdit


Old NorseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *natją, whence also Old English net, nett, Old Frisian nette, nitte, Old Saxon net, nett, netti, Old High German nezzi, Gothic 𐌽𐌰𐍄𐌹 (nati). Ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *ned- (to turn, twist, knot).

NounEdit

net n

  1. net

DescendantsEdit


PortugueseEdit

NounEdit

net f (uncountable)

  1. Net; the Internet

SynonymsEdit


TurkishEdit

AdjectiveEdit

net (comparative daha net, superlative en net)

  1. clear
  2. manifest

NounEdit

net (definite accusative neti, plural netler)

  1. (sports) The net used in ping-pong or tenis.

DeclensionEdit


West FrisianEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Compare Saterland Frisian nit, English not, Dutch niet, German nicht

AdverbEdit

net

  1. not

Etymology 2Edit

From Old Frisian nette, nitte, from Proto-Germanic *natją, from Proto-Indo-European *ned- (to turn, twist, knot). Compare English net, Dutch net, Low German Nett, German Netz, Danish net, Swedish nät.

NounEdit

net

  1. net