mea culpa

EnglishEdit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

EtymologyEdit

From the Latin phrase meā culpā (through my fault), from mea (my, mine) and culpa (fault) in the ablative

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˌmeɪ.əˈkʊl.pə/, /ˌmeɪ.əˈkʌl.pə/, /ˌmiː.əˈkʊl.pə/, /ˌmiː.əˈkʌl.pə/

InterjectionEdit

mea culpa

  1. My fault, due to my error; I am to blame.

NounEdit

mea culpa (plural mea culpas or mea culpae)

  1. An instance of mea culpa; an apology.
    • 2018 January 13, Tad Bartimus, “When There’s Nuke Headed Your Way, ‘Do What You Gotta Do’”, in Civil Beat:
      Basketball had been replaced by breathless commentators cross-talking and speculating, politicians on split screens eagerly interrupting each other to find scapegoats, and most mute (male) state officials, including Hawaii Gov. David Ige, opening their mouths to sputter (paraphrasing here) — golly gee, we don’t know what happened, but we plan to find out — mea culpas.
    • 2021 September 1, Michael D. Shear; Jim Tankersley, “Biden Defends Afghan Pullout and Declares an End to Nation-Building”, in The New York Times[1], ISSN 0362-4331:
      The president refused to offer any sort of mea culpa on Tuesday, even as the Taliban celebrated their “independence” from America with gunfire in the streets of Kabul.

SynonymsEdit

TranslationsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From the Latin phrase meā culpā (through my fault), from mea (my, mine) and culpa (fault) in the ablative

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /me.a kul.pa/
  • (file)

InterjectionEdit

mea culpa

  1. mea culpa

LatinEdit

PronunciationEdit

PhraseEdit

meā culpā

  1. through my fault
    • (Can we date this quote?), Text of the Tridentine Mass:
      Confiteor Deo omnipotenti, beatæ Mariæ semper Virgini, beato Michaeli Archangelo, beato Ioanni Baptistæ, sanctis Apostolis Petro et Paulo, omnibus Sanctis, et vobis, fratres: quia peccavi nimis cogitatione, verbo et opere: mea culpa, mea culpa, mea maxima culpa.
      I confess to the Almighty God, to the blessed Mary ever Virgin, to blessed Michael the Archangel, to blessed John the Baptist, to the holy Apostles Peter and Paul, to all the Saints, and to you brethren, that I have sinned exceedingly, in thought, word, and deed: through my fault, through my fault, through my most grievous fault.

PolishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin meā culpā.

PronunciationEdit

PhraseEdit

mea culpa

  1. mea culpa

Further readingEdit

  • mea culpa in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • mea culpa in Polish dictionaries at PWN