Translingual

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Etymology

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Abbreviation of English Myanmar, formerly Burma, where Burmese is spoken.

Symbol

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my

  1. (international standards) ISO 639-1 language code for Burmese.

English

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English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Alternative forms

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Pronunciation

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  • (stressed) enPR: IPA(key): /maɪ/
    • Audio (US):(file)
  • (unstressed) IPA(key): /maɪ/, /mə/
    • (unstressed, UK) IPA(key): /mɪ/, /mi/
  • (Ireland, Scouse, some speakers) IPA(key): /mi/
  • Rhymes: -aɪ
  • Homophones: muh, me (some dialects)

Etymology 1

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From Middle English mi, my, apocopated form of min, myn, from Old English mīn (my, mine), from Proto-West Germanic *mīn, from Proto-Germanic *mīnaz (my, mine, pron.) (possessive of *ek (I)), from Proto-Indo-European *méynos (my; mine).

Cognate with West Frisian myn (my), Afrikaans my (my), Dutch mijn (my), German mein (my), Swedish min (my). More at me.

Determiner

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my

  1. First-person singular possessive determiner. See Appendix:Possessive#English.
    1. Belonging to me.
      I can't find my book.
    2. Associated with me.
      My seat at the restaurant was uncomfortable.
      Don't you know my name?
      I recognised him because he had attended my school.
    3. Related to me.
      My parents won't let me go out tonight.
    4. In the possession of me.
      I have to take my books back to the library soon.
Derived terms
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Translations
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See also
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Etymology 2

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An abbreviation of an oath such as my word or my Lord

Interjection

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my

  1. Used to express surprise, shock or amazement.
    My, what big teeth you have!
Derived terms
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Afrikaans

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Pronunciation

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Etymology 1

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From Dutch mij.

Pronoun

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my (subject ek)

  1. me (object)
Alternative forms
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  • mij (obsolete)
  • mijn (obsolete, rare)

See also

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Etymology 2

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From Dutch mijn.

Determiner

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my

  1. my; of me
Alternative forms
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See also

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Cameroon Pidgin

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Alternative forms

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Pronunciation

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Determiner

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my

  1. 1st person singular possessive determiner

See also

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Chinese Pidgin English

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Etymology

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From English my.

Pronoun

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my

  1. I (subject pronoun)
    Synonyms: I, me
    • 1836 January, “Jargon spoken at Canton: how it originated and has grown into use; mode in which the Chinese learn English; examples of the language in common use between foreigners and Chinese”, in The Chinese Repository, volume IV, number 9, page 433:
      My wanchee takee go away alla this cover, putee nother piece,’ replied I.
      (please add an English translation of this quotation)
  2. me (object pronoun)
    Synonym: me
  3. my (possessive pronoun)

Cornish

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Alternative forms

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  • (Standard Cornish) me

Etymology

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From Proto-Brythonic *mi, from Proto-Celtic *mī.

Pronoun

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my

  1. I, me

Czech

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Etymology

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Inherited from Old Czech my, from Proto-Slavic *my, from Proto-Indo-European *wéy.

Pronunciation

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Pronoun

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my

  1. we

Declension

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Further reading

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  • my in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • my in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989
  • my in Internetová jazyková příručka

Danish

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Noun

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my n (singular definite myet, plural indefinite myer)

  1. The Greek letter μ (mu)

Declension

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Noun

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my c

  1. micron

Synonyms

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References

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Egyptian

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Etymology

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mj (like) +‎ -j (adverbializing suffix).

Pronunciation

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Adverb

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miii
  1. likewise
  2. accordingly

References

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  • James P[eter] Allen (2010) Middle Egyptian: An Introduction to the Language and Culture of Hieroglyphs, 2nd edition, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, →ISBN, page 86.

Lower Sorbian

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Etymology

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From Proto-Slavic *my, from Proto-Indo-European *nos.

Pronoun

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my pl

  1. we

Declension

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Manx

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Etymology

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From Old Irish , from Proto-Celtic *mā, *ma (compare Cornish and Breton mar), from Proto-Indo-European *meh₂.

Conjunction

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my

  1. if

Middle English

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Determiner

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my (subjective pronoun I)

  1. Alternative form of mi

Old Czech

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Etymology

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Inherited from Proto-Slavic *my.

Pronunciation

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Pronoun

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my

  1. we (first person plural)

Declension

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Descendants

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  • Czech: my

References

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Old Polish

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Etymology

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Inherited from Proto-Slavic *my. First attested in the 14th century.

Pronunciation

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Pronoun

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my

  1. we; first person plural
  2. we; I royal first person plural

Declension

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Descendants

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  • Masurian: mi
  • Polish: my
  • Silesian: my

References

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Polish

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Polish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pl

Pronunciation

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Etymology 1

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Inherited from Old Polish my.

Pronoun

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my

  1. we; first person plural
  2. we; I royal first person plural
  3. we; I editorial first person plural
Declension
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See also

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Etymology 2

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Borrowed from Ancient Greek μῦ (), from Phoenician 𐤌 (m‬ /⁠mēm⁠/).

Alternative forms

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Noun

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my n (indeclinable)

  1. mu (Greek letter Μ, μ)

Trivia

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According to Słownik frekwencyjny polszczyzny współczesnej (1990), my is one of the most used words in Polish, appearing 88 times in scientific texts, 30 times in news, 138 times in essays, 200 times in fiction, and 419 times in plays, each out of a corpus of 100,000 words, totaling 875 times, making it the 49th most common word in a corpus of 500,000 words.[1]

References

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  1. ^ Ida Kurcz (1990) “my”, in Słownik frekwencyjny polszczyzny współczesnej [Frequency dictionary of the Polish language]‎[1] (in Polish), volume 1, Kraków, Warszawa: Polska Akademia Nauk. Instytut Języka Polskiego, page 259

Further reading

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  • my in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • my in Polish dictionaries at PWN
  • Maria Renata Mayenowa, Stanisław Rospond, Witold Taszycki, Stefan Hrabec, Władysław Kuraszkiewicz (2010-2023) “my”, in Słownik Polszczyzny XVI Wieku [A Dictionary of 16th Century Polish]
  • MY”, in Elektroniczny Słownik Języka Polskiego XVII i XVIII Wieku [Electronic Dictionary of the Polish Language of the XVII and XVIII Century], 2021 June 22
  • Samuel Bogumił Linde (1807–1814) “my”, in Słownik języka polskiego[2]
  • Aleksander Zdanowicz (1861) “my”, in Słownik języka polskiego, Wilno 1861[3]
  • J. Karłowicz, A. Kryński, W. Niedźwiedzki, editors (1902), “my”, in Słownik języka polskiego (in Polish), volume 2, Warsaw, page 1081

Portuguese

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Pronoun

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my

  1. Obsolete form of mim.

Scots

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Alternative forms

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Etymology

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Inherited from Middle English mi, my, apocopated form of min, myn, from Old English mīn (my, mine), from Proto-West Germanic *mīn, from Proto-Germanic *mīnaz (my, mine, pron.) (possessive of *ek (I)), from Proto-Indo-European *méynos (my; mine).

Determiner

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my

  1. my
    Synonym: mine

See also

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References

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Silesian

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Etymology

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Inherited from Old Polish my.

Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): /ˈmɪ/
  • Rhymes:
  • Syllabification: my

Pronoun

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my

  1. we; first person plural

Declension

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Further reading

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  • my in silling.org

Slovak

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Etymology

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Inherited from Proto-Slavic *my, from Proto-Indo-European *nos.

Pronunciation

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Pronoun

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my

  1. we
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Further reading

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  • my”, in Slovníkový portál Jazykovedného ústavu Ľ. Štúra SAV [Dictionary portal of the Ľ. Štúr Institute of Linguistics, Slovak Academy of Science] (in Slovak), https://slovnik.juls.savba.sk, 2024

Swedish

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Noun

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my n

  1. The Greek letter μ (mu)

Upper Sorbian

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Etymology

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From Proto-Slavic *my, from Proto-Indo-European *wéy.

Pronoun

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my

  1. we

Declension

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Further reading

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  • my” in Soblex

West Frisian

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Etymology

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From Old Frisian , from Proto-Germanic *miz.

Pronunciation

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Pronoun

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my

  1. object of ik