Contents

EnglishEdit

 
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Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • (stressed) enPR: IPA(key): /maɪ/
  • (unstressed) IPA(key): /maɪ/, /mə/
    • (unstressed, Cockney) IPA(key): /mɪ/, /mi/
  • IPA(key): /mi/ in some speakers of Hiberno-English, Scouse
  • Rhymes: -aɪ
  • Homophone: muh (some dialects)

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English my, apocopated form of min, myn, from Old English mīn (my, mine), from Proto-Germanic *mīnaz (my, mine, pron.) (genitive of *ek (I)), from Proto-Indo-European *méynos (my; mine). Cognate with West Frisian myn (my), Afrikaans my (my), Dutch mijn (my), German mein (my), Swedish min (my). More at me.

DeterminerEdit

my

  1. First-person singular possessive determiner. See Appendix:Possessive#English.
    1. Belonging to me.
      I can't find my book.
    2. Associated with me.
      My seat at the restaurant was uncomfortable.
      Don't you know my name?
      I recognised him because he had attended my school.
    3. Related to me.
      My parents won't let me go out tonight.
    4. In the possession of me.
      I have to take my books back to the library soon.
Related termsEdit
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit
See alsoEdit

Etymology 2Edit

An abbreviation of an oath such as my word or my lord

InterjectionEdit

my

  1. (dated) Used to express surprise, shock or amazement.
    My, what big teeth you have!
Derived termsEdit

StatisticsEdit

Most common English words before 1923 in Project Gutenberg: him · she · they · #34: my · were · are · their

AfrikaansEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Dutch mij.

PronounEdit

my (subject ek)

  1. me (object)

See alsoEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Dutch mijn.

DeterminerEdit

my

  1. my; of me

See alsoEdit


CornishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Brythonic *mi, from Proto-Celtic *mī.

PronounEdit

my

  1. I, me

CzechEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Slavic *my, from Proto-Indo-European *nos

PronunciationEdit

PronounEdit

my

  1. we

DeclensionEdit


DanishEdit

NounEdit

my n (singular definite myet, plural indefinite myer)

  1. The Greek letter μ (mu)

DeclensionEdit

NounEdit

my c

  1. micron

SynonymsEdit

ReferencesEdit


EgyptianEdit

Alternative formsEdit

Hieroglyphic signage
     

W19-M17-M17

PronunciationEdit

Wikipedia: Manuel de Codage

AdverbEdit

my

  1. accordingly

LojbanEdit

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

CmavoEdit

my (selma'o BY2 )

  1. Letteral for m.

Lower SorbianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Slavic *my, from Proto-Indo-European *nos

PronounEdit

my pl

  1. we

DeclensionEdit


ManxEdit

ConjunctionEdit

my

  1. if

PolishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Slavic *my, from Proto-Indo-European *nos.

PronunciationEdit

PronounEdit

my

  1. we (first person plural )

DeclensionEdit

See alsoEdit

External linksEdit

  • my in Polish dictionaries at PWN

PortugueseEdit

PronounEdit

my

  1. Obsolete form of mim.

SlovakEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Slavic *my, from Proto-Indo-European *nos

PronounEdit

my

  1. we

Related termsEdit

External linksEdit

  • my in Slovak dictionaries at korpus.sk

SwedishEdit

NounEdit

my n

  1. The Greek letter μ (mu)

Upper SorbianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Slavic *my, from Proto-Indo-European *nos

PronounEdit

my

  1. we

West FrisianEdit

PronunciationEdit

PronounEdit

my

  1. me

WestrobothnianEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): [mýː], [mǿʏ̯ː], [mʊ́ɪ̯ː]
    Rhymes: -ýː

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse , from Proto-Germanic *mugjǭ, *mują, from Proto-Indo-European *mu (fly), *mew-. Cognates with Norwegian mygg, Swedish mygga, Danish myg, Old English mycg, mycge (whence Middle English mygga, English midge); Old High German mucka (German Mücke (mosquito)); Latvian muša; Albanian mizë; Russian муха (múxa); Ancient Greek μυῖα (muîa); Ukrainian муха (múxa); Bulgarian муха (múxa); Lower Sorbian mucha, Polish mucha and Slovak mucha. Akin to Latin musca (fly). Compare the Dutch mug.

NounEdit

my n

  1. (collective) mosquitoes

NounEdit

my f

  1. mosquito

Derived termsEdit