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See also: mērci and merçi

Contents

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

French merci (thank you)

InterjectionEdit

merci

  1. (colloquial) thank you
    • 2005, Victoria Laurie, A Vision of Murder:: A Psychic Eye Mystery, →ISBN:
      Rebecca Rosen, merci for helping me to understand that connection between you and The Other Side, and making the character of Theresa come alive.
    • 2008, Lewis H. Siegelbaum, Cars for Comrades: The Life of the Soviet Automobile, →ISBN:
      "Improve the roads! Merci for the reception!" With this insouciant remark and the banner he affixed to his automobile that read "Auto rally against roadlessness and slovenliness!"
    • 2014, Art Wiederhold, Hunter: Quebec, →ISBN:
      Merci, Bob. I'll inform Lauren,” Bergere said as he hurried out of the office.

NounEdit

merci (plural mercis)

  1. An extra card or set of cards that is allowed to play at the end of various card games.
    • 1995, Peter Arnold, The Book of Card Games, →ISBN, page 15:
      Few games are won without the merci. In the final deal a King above a card of the same suit automatically blocks the game, and the merci should be used to free such a card.

AnagramsEdit


Alemannic GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from French merci.

PronunciationEdit

InterjectionEdit

merci

  1. thank you

SynonymsEdit


CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from French merci.

PronunciationEdit

InterjectionEdit

merci

  1. (colloquial) thank you

SynonymsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle French merci, mercy, from Old French merci, from Latin mercēdem, accusative singular of mercēs (wages, fee, price).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /mɛʁ.si/
  • (France, Paris) IPA(key): [mɛʁ.si]
  • (file)
  • (Louisiana) IPA(key): [mæ(ɾ).si]
  • Homophone: mercis

InterjectionEdit

merci

  1. thank you

NounEdit

merci f (uncountable)

  1. mercy, grace

DescendantsEdit

  • Alemannic German: merci
  • Arabic: مرسي(mersī, thanks (colloquial))
  • Armenian: մերսի (mersi, thanks (colloquial))
  • Bulgarian: мерси́ (mersí, thanks (colloquial))
  • Catalan: merci

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from French merci.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): [mɛʁˈsiː], /ˈmɛʁ.si/

InterjectionEdit

merci

  1. (Switzerland) thank you

SynonymsEdit

Further readingEdit


ItalianEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • Hyphenation: mèr‧ci

NounEdit

merci f

  1. plural of merce

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

NounEdit

mercī

  1. dative singular of merx

NormanEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French merci (mercy; clemency), from Latin mercēs, mercēdem (wages, fee, price).

InterjectionEdit

merci

  1. (Guernsey) thank you

Derived termsEdit


Old FrenchEdit

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

merci f (nominative singular merci)

  1. mercy; clemency
    • circa 1176, Chrétien de Troyes, 'Cligès':
      Se vos metez an sa merci
      Nus (fors le conte qui est ci)
      de vos n'i a mort desservie
      ja ne perdroiz manbre ne vie
      If you throw yourselves on his mercy
      None (apart from the count who is here)
      of you deserve death;
      you will lose neither life nor limb
    • 13th century, Herman de Valenciennes, Assomption Nostre Dame, page 7, column 2, lines 16-17:
      ceo sacez m'amie tuit cil que te requerunt
      a tun commandement merci auvrunt
      this you know, my friend, that all those who are looking for you
      upon your command will have mercy