See also: Metropolitan

English

edit
 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Etymology

edit

From Late Latin metropolitanus, from Ancient Greek μητροπολίτης (mētropolítēs).

Pronunciation

edit
  • (UK) IPA(key): /mɛ.tɹəˈpɒ.lɪ.tən/
  • (US) IPA(key): /mɛ.tɹəˈpɑ.lɪ.tən/
  • Audio (US):(file)
  • Rhymes: -ɒlɪtən
  • Hyphenation: me‧tro‧po‧li‧tan

Noun

edit

metropolitan (plural metropolitans)

  1. (Orthodox Christianity) A bishop empowered to oversee other bishops; an archbishop. [from 15th c.]
    Synonym: metropolitan bishop
    • 1663, Edward Waterhous [i.e., Edward Waterhouse], chapter I, in Fortescutus Illustratus; or A Commentary on that Nervous Treatise De Laudibus Legum Angliæ, Written by Sir John Fortescue Knight, [], London: [] Tho[mas] Roycroft for Thomas Dicas [], →OCLC, page 38:
      I knovv God by Miracle can inſtruct Kings, as he rained Mannah, and raiſed the Apoſtles from letterless Fiſher-men, to learned Metropolitans, and profound Doctours.
    • 2009, Diarmaid MacCulloch, A History of Christianity, Penguin, published 2010, page 514:
      Yet from the late thirteenth century the metropolitan based himself either in Moscow or Vladimir-on-the-Kliazma, which was also in Muscovite territory, and it became the ambition of the Muscovites to make this arrangement permanent.
  2. The inhabitant of a metropolis. [from 18th c.]

Translations

edit

Adjective

edit

metropolitan (comparative more metropolitan, superlative most metropolitan)

  1. (Orthodox Christianity) Pertaining to the see or province of a metropolitan. [from 15th c.]
  2. Of, or pertaining to, a metropolis or other large urban settlement. [from 16th c.]
  3. Of or pertaining to the parent state of a colony or territory, or the home country, e.g. metropolitan France
    • 1974, New Zealand Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Report on the Tokelau Islands, page 8:
      Policies relating to the elimination of racial discrimination which obtain in metropolitan New Zealand are applicable in the Tokelau Islands.
    • 2015, Wouter Veenendaal, The Dutch Caribbean municipalities in comparative perspective. Island Studies Journal 10(1): 15–30:
      the new political status of these islands marks a definite break with the traditional Dutch colonial practice to keep its Caribbean colonies at a distance; and, after 2010, Dutch metropolitan laws and dministrative practices started being implemented on the islands.

Antonyms

edit

Derived terms

edit

Translations

edit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Ladin

edit

Adjective

edit

metropolitan m (feminine singular metropolitana, masculine plural metropolitans, feminine plural metropolitanes)

  1. metropolitan

Romanian

edit

Etymology

edit

Borrowed from French métropolitain.

Noun

edit

metropolitan n (plural metropolitane)

  1. (dated) metro, subway, underground

Declension

edit