underground

See also: Underground

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

under +‎ ground.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

underground (comparative more underground, superlative most underground)

  1. (not comparable) Below the ground; below the surface of the Earth.
    There is an underground tunnel that takes you across the river.
  2. Hidden, furtive, secretive.
    These criminals operate through an underground network.
  3. Of music, art, etc, outside the mainstream.

SynonymsEdit

TranslationsEdit

AdverbEdit

underground (comparative more underground, superlative most underground)

  1. Below the ground.
    The tunnel goes underground at this point.
  2. Secretly.

SynonymsEdit

TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

underground (plural undergrounds)

Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia

  1. (chiefly UK) An underground railway.
  2. (with "the") A movement or organisation of people who resist political convention.
  3. (with "the") A movement or organisation of people who resist artistic convention.

SynonymsEdit

  • (underground railway): metro, métro (the underground railway of Paris), subway (US), Tube (British - the underground railway of London)
  • (movement or organisation of people who resist political convention): resistance
  • (movement or organisation of people who resist artistic convention): avant-garde, counter-culture

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

underground (third-person singular simple present undergrounds, present participle undergrounding, simple past and past participle undergrounded)

  1. To route electricity distribution cables underground
    • 1962, David Pesonen, “Battles Over Energy”, in Carolyn Merchant editor, Green Versus Gold: Sources in California's Environmental History[1], Island Press, ISBN 9781559635806, published 1998, page 325:
      One is to underground where no other alternative will work, and this method should be used universally in urban regions as it now is in “downtown” sections.
    • 2004, Don L. Ivey and C. Paul Scott, “Solutions”, in Transportation Research Board Committee on Utilities editor, Utilities and Roadside Safety[2], State of the Art Report 9, Transportation Research Board, ISBN 9780309094511, page 9:
      Also, undergrounding may not eliminate the potential for crashes with other roadside objects, such as trees, walls, buildings, and so forth. [...] When looking at the fesibility of undergrounding utilities, the complete roadside area and nearby adjacent properties should be evaluated for potential roadside obstructions or hazards.
    • 2006, Janes Northcote-Green, Robert Wilson, “Design, Construction and Operation of Distribution Systems, MV Networks”, in Control and Automation of Electrical Power Distribution Systems[3], CRC Press, ISBN 9780824726317, page 110:
      The utility now wants the network to be undergrounded in the urban areas, which would mean substations with 33 kV distribution swtichgear.

TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit


FinnishEdit

EtymologyEdit

English underground

NounEdit

underground

  1. underground (culture)

DeclensionEdit


FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /œ̃.dɛʁ.ɡʁawnd/

AdjectiveEdit

underground m, f (invariable)

  1. underground (outside the mainstream)

NounEdit

underground m

  1. (singular only) the underground (people who resist artistic convention)

ItalianEdit

NounEdit

l'underground m (invariable)

  1. the underground (people who resist artistic convention)
Last modified on 4 March 2014, at 08:38