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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

First attested in Middle English: from Late Latin mētropolis, from Ancient Greek μητρόπολις (mētrópolis, mother city), from μήτηρ (mḗtēr, mother) + πόλις (pólis, city (state)).[1]

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

metropolis (plural metropolises or metropoleis)

  1. (historical) The mother (founding) polis (city state) of a colony, especially in the Hellenistic world.
    1. The mother country of a colony.
      • 2010, James Mahoney, Colonialism and Postcolonial Development: Spanish America in Comparative Perspective:
        Colonies certainly did not become "clones" of their metropolises, but it is equally false that their colonial heritages were not influenced by the organization of the metropolises.
  2. A large, busy city, especially as the main city in an area or country or as distinguished from surrounding rural areas.
  3. (canon law) The see of a metropolitan archbishop, ranking above its suffragan diocesan bishops.

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. 1.0 1.1 The Concise Oxford English Dictionary [Eleventh Edition]

DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin mētropolis, from Ancient Greek μητρόπολις (mētrópolis, mother city).

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: me‧tro‧po‧lis

NounEdit

metropolis f (plural metropolissen, diminutive metropolisje n)

  1. metropolis

SynonymsEdit

Related termsEdit


LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

Late Latin, from Ancient Greek μητρόπολις (mētrópolis, a city or mother state), from μητρο- (mētro-, mother-) + πόλις (pólis, city).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

mētropolis f (genitive mētropolis); third declension

  1. metropolis

InflectionEdit

Third declension, alternative accusative singular in -im, alternative ablative singular in and accusative plural in -īs.

Case Singular Plural
nominative mētropolis mētropolēs
genitive mētropolis mētropolium
dative mētropolī mētropolibus
accusative mētropolem
mētropolim
mētropolin
mētropolēs
mētropolīs
ablative mētropole
mētropolī
mētropolibus
vocative mētropolis mētropolēs

The accusative singular mētropolem and the ablative singular mētropole occur in Medieval and New Latin.

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • metropolis in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • metropolis in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette, page 974
  • metropolis in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition, 1883–1887)
  • metropolis in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • metropolis in William Smith, editor (1854, 1857) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography, volume 1 & 2, London: Walton and Maberly
  • metropolis in William Smith et al., editor (1890) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, London: William Wayte. G. E. Marindin
    colonia in William Smith et al., editor (1890) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, London: William Wayte. G. E. Marindin

Serbo-CroatianEdit

NounEdit

metròpolis m (Cyrillic spelling метро̀полис)

  1. A metropolis

DeclensionEdit


SpanishEdit

NounEdit

metropolis

  1. plural of metropoli