See also: Mose, Mosè, and Möse

DanishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /moːsə/, [ˈmoːsə]

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Norse mosi.

NounEdit

mose c (singular definite mosen, plural indefinite moser)

  1. bog (expanse of marshland)
  2. moor (region with poor, marshy soil, peat, and heath)
InflectionEdit

Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From German Low German mosen.

VerbEdit

mose (imperative mos, infinitive at mose, present tense moser, past tense mosede, perfect tense har moset)

  1. mash (convert (something) into a mash)
  2. slog (to walk slowly, encountering resistance)
  3. zip (to move in haste)

GothicEdit

RomanizationEdit

mose

  1. Romanization of 𐌼𐍉𐍃𐌴

Middle EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old English māse (titmouse); see English titmouse.

NounEdit

mose (plural moses)

  1. a small bird, a tit, titmouse, coalmouse
    • 1935 [c. 1250], J. H. G. Grattan and G. F. H. Sykes (eds.), The Owl and the Nightingale, poem attributed to Nicholas de Guildford:
      Ne myht þu leng a word iqueþe, Ac pipest al so doþ a mose
      You can make not a further word, But peep as does a titmouse

Etymology 2Edit

VerbEdit

mose

  1. Alternative form of musen

Norwegian BokmålEdit

 
Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia no

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse mosi

NounEdit

mose m (definite singular mosen, indefinite plural moser, definite plural mosene)

  1. moss (plant in the Bryophyta family)
  2. (obsolete) a moor (region with poor, marshy soil, peat, and heath)

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

 
Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nn

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse mosi

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

mose m (definite singular mosen, indefinite plural mosar, definite plural mosane)

  1. moss (plant in the Bryophyta family)

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


SothoEdit

NounEdit

mose 18 (uncountable)

  1. overseas

VenetianEdit

NounEdit

mose

  1. plural of mosa