See also: This, thîs, and þis

EnglishEdit

 
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EtymologyEdit

From Middle English this, from Old English þis (neuter demonstrative), from North Sea Germanic base *þa- "that", from Proto-Germanic *þat, from Proto-Indo-European *tód, extended form of demonstrative base *to-; + North Sea Germanic definitive suffix -s, from Proto-Indo-European *só (this, that).

Cognate with Scots this (this), Saterland Frisian dusse (this), West Frisian dizze (this), German dies, dieses (this).

PronunciationEdit

  • enPR: thĭs, IPA(key): /ðɪs/, /ðəs/
  • (file)
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɪs

DeterminerEdit

this (plural these)

  1. The (thing) here (used in indicating something or someone nearby).
    This classroom is where I learned to read and write.
  2. The known (thing) (used in indicating something or someone just mentioned).
    They give the appearance of knowing what they're doing. It's this appearance that lets them get away with so much.
  3. The known (thing) (used in indicating something or someone about to be mentioned).
    When asked what he wanted for his birthday, he gave this reply: “[…]”
  4. (informal) A known (thing) (used in first mentioning a person or thing that the speaker does not think is known to the audience). Compare with "a certain ...".
    I met this woman the other day who's allergic to wheat. I didn't even know that was possible!
    There's just this nervous mannerism that Bob has with his hands, and it drives me crazy.
  5. (of a time reference) Designates the current or next instance. Cf. next.
    It's cold this morning.
    I plan to go to London this Friday.

Related termsEdit

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

AdverbEdit

this (not comparable)

  1. To the degree or extent indicated.
    I need this much water.
    Do we need this many recommendations?
    We've already come this far, we can't turn back now.

TranslationsEdit

PronounEdit

this (plural these)

  1. The thing, item, etc. being indicated.
    This isn't the item that I ordered.
    • c. 1603–1606, William Shakespeare, “The Tragedie of King Lear”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: [] Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358, [Act I, scene ii]:
      This is the excellent foppery of the world, that, when we are sick in fortune,—often the surfeit of our own behaviour,—we make guilty of our disasters the sun, the moon, and the stars []

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

this (plural thises)

  1. (philosophy) Something being indicated that is here; one of these.
    • 2001, James G. Lennox, Aristotle's Philosophy of Biology, page 151:
      Terms like 'house', 'sphere', 'animal', and 'human' do not refer to other thises distinct from these ones here — they refer to the sort of thing these ones here are.
  2. (computing) Referring to the current context in a programming environment in C-like languages.

InterjectionEdit

this

  1. (Internet slang) Indicates the speaker's strong approval or agreement with the previous material.

SynonymsEdit

AnagramsEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

DeterminerEdit

this

  1. Alternative spelling of þis (this)

PronounEdit

this

  1. Alternative spelling of þis (this)

AdverbEdit

this

  1. Alternative spelling of þis (this)

Etymology 2Edit

DeterminerEdit

this

  1. Alternative spelling of þis (these)

PronounEdit

this

  1. Alternative spelling of þis (these)

QuechuaEdit

EtymologyEdit

onomatopoeia

PronunciationEdit

InterjectionEdit

this

  1. the sound a cat makes when preparing to attack something
  2. the sound of damp wood burning

ReferencesEdit

  • “this” in Academia Mayor de la Lengua Quechua (2006) Diccionario quechua-español-quechua, 2nd edition, Cusco: Edmundo Pantigozo, page 207.

ScotsEdit

DeterminerEdit

this (plural thir)

  1. this
  2. Doric form of thir (these)
    This plants is deid.
    (please add an English translation of this usage example)

PronounEdit

this (plural thir)

  1. this
  2. Doric form of thir (these)