Last modified on 8 March 2015, at 00:10

bog

EnglishEdit

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PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Irish and Scottish Gaelic bogach (soft, boggy ground), from Old Irish bog (soft), from Proto-Celtic *buggos (soft, tender) + Old Irish -ach, from Proto-Celtic *-ākos.

NounEdit

bog (plural bogs)

  1. An expanse of marshland.
  2. (Ireland, UK, New Zealand, vulgar, slang) A toilet.
  3. (US, dialect) A little elevated spot or clump of earth, roots, and grass, in a marsh or swamp.
SynonymsEdit
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

bog (third-person singular simple present bogs, present participle bogging, simple past and past participle bogged)

  1. (intransitive, informal) To become (figuratively or literally) mired or stuck.
  2. (transitive, UK, informal) To make a mess of something.
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

by shortening and euphemistic alteration from bugger

VerbEdit

bog (third-person singular simple present bogs, present participle bogging, simple past and past participle bogged)

  1. (euphemistic, slang, UK, with "off") To go away.
Derived termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


DanishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Norse bók (beech, book), from Proto-Germanic *bōks, from Proto-Indo-European *bʰeh₂ǵos (beech).

NounEdit

bog c (singular definite bogen, plural indefinite bøger)

  1. book
Derived termsEdit
InflectionEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Maybe from Middle Low German bōk.

NounEdit

bog c (singular definite bogen, plural indefinite bog)

  1. beech mast
InflectionEdit
Related termsEdit

External linksEdit


FrenchEdit

NounEdit

bog m (plural bogs)

  1. (ecology) An ombrotrophic peatland.

AntonymsEdit

External linksEdit


GermanEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

bog

  1. past tense of biegen.

HungarianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Finno-Ugric *poŋka (tuber, boil, unevenness), along with Estonian pung.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

bog (plural bogok)

  1. knot

IrishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Irish boc (soft, gentle, tender; tepid).

AdjectiveEdit

bog

  1. soft; yielding; tender; (of physical condition) flabby; (of disposition) indulgent, lenient, soft, foolish; (of living, conduct, etc.) easy; (of sound, voice) soft, mellow; (of weather) soft, wet; (of winter) mild, humid
  2. loose
  3. lukewarm
DeclensionEdit
Derived termsEdit

NounEdit

bog m (genitive boig)

  1. soft
  2. (anatomy, of ear) lobe
DeclensionEdit
SynonymsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Old Irish bocaid (softens, makes soft; moves; shakes), from boc (see above).

VerbEdit

bog (present analytic bogann, future analytic bogfaidh, verbal noun bogadh, past participle bogtha)

  1. to soften, become soft; (of pain) to ease; (of milk) to warm; (of weather) to get milder; to soften, move (someone's heart)
  2. to move, loosen; (of a cradle) to rock
ConjugationEdit
Derived termsEdit

MutationEdit

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
bog bhog mbog
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

LojbanEdit

RafsiEdit

bog

  1. rafsi of bongu.

Lower SorbianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Slavic *bogъ.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

bog m (feminine equivalent bogowka)

  1. god

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit

  • bóžy (godly, divine)

NorwegianEdit

NounEdit

bog m

  1. shoulder (of an animal)

InflectionEdit


Old EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *bōguz. Cognate with Old Saxon bōg, Dutch boeg (shoulders, chest of a horse), Old High German buog (German Bug (horse’s hock, ship’s prow)), Old Norse bógr (Icelandic bógur, Swedish bog (shoulder)).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

bōg n (nominative plural bōg)

  1. the arm or shoulder
  2. a branch or bough of a tree

DescendantsEdit


Scottish GaelicEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Irish boc (soft, gentle, tender; tepid).

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

bog (comparative buige)

  1. soft
  2. wet, damp, moist

DeclensionEdit

Case Masculine singular Feminine singular Plural
Nominative bog bhog boga
Vocative bhuig bhog boga
Genitive bhuig bhuig/buige boga
Dative bhog bhuig boga

Derived termsEdit


Serbo-CroatianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Slavic *bogъ.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

bȏg m (Cyrillic spelling бо̑г)

  1. god, deity
  2. (colloquial) idol, god

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit


SloveneEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Slavic *bogъ.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

bóg m anim (genitive bogá, nominative plural bogôvi)

  1. god

DeclensionEdit